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Each work presented on this site of tribal art comes from private European and American collections. All of them have been meticulously appraised, and are accompanied by a certificate of authenticity, and are worthy of inclusion in the most beautiful collections of African art.

A permanent exhibition

Launched on June 1, 2019, the permanent exhibition "When the primitive arts express themselves" welcomes you from Monday to Saturday in the premises of Essentiel Galerie, to allow you to physically discover a wide variety of objects, regularly renewed. Do not hesitate to come and visit it at 73 rue de Tournai 7333 Tertre in Belgium. Phone: +32 65 529 100

The prices

Our knowledge of the tribal art market, based on 35 years of experience, has led us to make it a point of honor to always be the most competitive. We can thus, guarantee you the best prices.

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Latest tribal artworks

Bwa / Bwo Tominian carved figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Bwa statue

The African art sculptures of the Bobo , Bwa ("Red Bobo") , Kurumba and Mossi, frequently take up and combine stylized elements borrowed from humans, animals or even insects.
It is the spirits of nature that are supposed to determine the well-being and prosperity of an individual, and adversity will be considered as the result of neglect of collective rites.
This is a representation of a masked dancer embodying the Do spirit, dressed in his leaf costume and a crest mask with a horseman motif. This figure plays the role of mediator between men and their creator god Wuro. This sculpture comes from the village of Tominian in Mali. Matt patina, cracks and abrasions. The Bwa live in the west of Burkina Faso, extending into Mali, and are surrounded to the east by the ...


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650.00

Dogon fetish statuette
Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon Statuette

Exceptional African Dogon statuette collected in the 1950s by Monsieur Arnaud, accompanying Alain Bilot,
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renowned collector of Dogon art during study trips to Mali.

This sculpture depicts a woman wearing an elaborate headdress, standing with her legs tightly bent halfway, perched on a small pedestal. She presents an infant resting on forearms of inordinate length. An interesting grainy patina attests to the libations administered. Carved for the most part on commission by a family and in this case arranged on the family altar Tiré Kabou, the Dogon tribal statues can also be ...


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740.00

Yoruba maternity figure
Tribal art > African Maternity > Yoruba Maternity

This naturalistic altar sculpture, allowing communication with the afterlife, features as a maternal figure one of the many female goddesses, the earth goddess Onilé ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources, and linked to the powerful Ogboni society among the Yoruba Egba and Ijebu. It could also symbolize Orunmila , goddess of divination.
Intended to be enthroned on an altar, it was venerated by members of the powerful Ogboni, or Osugbo, society in charge of justice.
Matt crusty patina, very light pink ochre highlights. Missing.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the demise of the Ife ...


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490.00

Figure Niombo Bwendé, Bwemde
Tribal art > African Statues > Bwendé Statue

Ex-collection African art from Belgium.
This is a reduction figure of the niombo, a sometimes giant funerary anthropomorphic "bundle" representing the deceased, buried at funerals during ancestor cults. The doll is made of a wickerwork frame dressed in textile. It was kept in the house of the chiefs. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by the king ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory and copper trade and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. The sculptures of the Bwendé were strongly inspired by those of the neighboring Beembe.


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490.00

Dogon figurines
Tribal art > African fetish > Dogon figurines

Belgian African art collection.
Effigy of figurative ancestor seated, hands resting on knees. In African tribal art, this type of sculpture associated with individual worship adorned the Dogon family altar. Thick ritual crusty patina.

Carved for the most part on commission by a family, Dogon statues can also be the object of worship by the entire community. However, their functions remain little known. In parallel with Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lebe, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the Hogon, the Wagem, the cult of the ancestors under the authority of the patriarch, the Binou invoking the world of the spirits and directed by the priest of the Binou, and the society of the masks concerning funerals.


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390.00

Songye Nkishi statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Songye statue

Ample head with the features of the kifwebe mask for this work sculpted by the Songye, dedicated to a traditional magical use. This large fetish was individualized by the nganga for his client through symbolic and ritual elements in the form of metal, animal skin skirt, belt forming a braided raffia coil, and summit horn.
Misses, velvety matt patina, cracks.
These protection fetishes intended for dwellings come in a variety of styles in the many chiefdoms of Songye country. The Nkisi, Nkishi, acts as a mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, the smaller figures being of private use.
In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is ...


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950.00

Kneeling Dogon female figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon statue

This Dogon statue, narrow, with stretched limbs, represents a kneeling woman. Repeated ritual libations have given the surface a grainy appearance. The desiccated, cracked wood bears the marks of time. Carved for the most part on commission by a family and in this case arranged on the family altar Tiré Kabou, the Dogon tribal statues can also be the object of worship by the entire community when they commemorate, for example, the founding of the village. These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on ancestor altars and participate in various rituals including those of the seed and harvest periods. Their functions, however, remain little known. In parallel with Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lebe , relating to ...


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950.00

Pende Gitenga Mask
Tribal art > African mask > Pende Mask

Modest dimensions for this flat and circular mask, abstract, haloed with fibers and feathers, named Gitenga, which was held on the face thanks to the fish net attached to the posterior contours. It is a police mask of the circumcision camp, representing the sun at sunrise and sunset. Leon de Sousberghe has identified two types of masks, minganji plant fibers, associated with male society and mbuya wooden masks generally related to the village, with some exceptions however.
The seed live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the have settled on the banks of the Kasai river downstream of Tshikapa. The influences of the neighbouring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu, were imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the masks Mbuya, ...


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490.00

Dogon zoomorphic mask
Tribal art > African mask > Dogon mask

Among more than eighty types of African masks that have been recorded among the Dogon, this large-scale animal face mask embodies the buffalo, whose strength it symbolizes.
Sacrificial crusty patina, dry, locally flaking. Cracks of desiccation. Height on base: 86 cm.
The Dogon people are renowned in African tribal art for the myths and beliefs relating to their cosmogony.
The population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya).They produce more than 80 types of masks, the best known of which are the Kanaga , Sirigé , Satimbé , Walu . Most of them are used by the circumcised initiates of the Awa society, during ...


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690.00

Dogon crest mask
Tribal art > African mask > Dogon headdress

Basketry helmet, topped with an animal figure rising from a cap. Textile underlines the contours of the headdress, and girdles the head of an animal. The latter is streaked with intersecting lines. Velvety matt patina. Piece collected in 1986 on the Bandiagara cliff.
The Dogon people are renowned in African tribal art for the myths and beliefs relating to their cosmogony.
His population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya).More than 80 types of masks have been listed, the best known of which are the Kanaga , Sirigé , Satimbé , Walu . Most of them are used by the circumcised initiates of the Awa society, during funeral ...


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680.00

Fang ancestor figure of Byeri reliquary
Tribal art > African Statues > Fang statue

This anthropomorphic sculpture representing a richly adorned young woman is distinguished by the quality of its modeling, its patina evoking a dark skin on which the copper ornaments form a brilliant contrast. Among the characteristics of the Ntumu style from the regions between Gabon, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea is the pouting of the prognathic jaw. The bust is pierced with a cavity in order to introduce magical elements or relics of the deceased. Bright patina, abrasions. Local restoration with brass staples. Cracks of desiccation. Among the Fang of Cameroon and in Gabon, each family has a "Byeri", or reliquary box, in which the bones of ancestors are kept. These boxes were guarded by the oldest man in the village, the "esa". The reliquary boxes were surmounted by a statue or a ...


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750.00

Makonde Lipoko Mask
Tribal art > African mask > Makonde mask

Striking realism for this African mask Makonde embodying an ancestral spirit. The ancestors would come back masked to mark their satisfaction following the initiation. The mouth is represented with a labret. The incised patterns refer to the traditional tattoos and scarifications of the Makonde. Maroon patina. Abrasions.
The Makonde of northern Mozambique and southern Tanzania wore helmet masks called lipiko during initiation ceremonies for young men. The Makonde worship an ancestor , which explains the abundance of naturalistic female statuary. In addition to the facial masks worn during mapiko dances and ngoma ceremonies that instruct youth about the requirements of marriage and family life. the Makonde also produce body masks featuring the female bust. (Art and Life ...


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490.00

Statue Nkisi Nkondi Solongo / Woyo
Tribal art > African Statues > Nkondi statue

African Kongo art and its spiritual receptacles
This village fetish relating to the khimba society, has, in Kongo tribal culture, a protective function against witchcraft. This tribal sculpture studded with nails is qualified as a "nkisi" object thanks to the cylindrical receptacle on the abdomen loaded with "bilongo" magical ingredients (organic and vegetable matter). It is closed by a mirror on which a resin has been applied. The glazed look constituting the famous Kongo look suggests an extralucid capacity.

Matt patina, polychrome highlights, cracks. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads between the present-day DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with ...


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1180.00

Lobi Bateba masculine figurines
Tribal art > African Statues > Lobi figure

This Lobi statuette "Bateba" was placed on the altar after a ritual to become the receptacle of a bush spirit, the Thil, and thus become an active being, an intermediary who fights against sorcerers and all other evil forces. The small spherical head, slightly tilted to the side, surmounts a narrow bust with drooping shoulders and arms that are placed alongside the body. The figure stands upright on wide feet. Golden brown glossy surface showing the wood grain.
When honored, these spirits manifest their benevolence in the form of abundant rains, good health, numerous births; Ignored, they withdraw it and bring devastating epidemics, drought and suffering.
These spirits transmit to the diviners the laws that the followers must follow to receive their protection.
They ...


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380.00

Mambila anthropomorphic jar
Tribal art > African Terracotta > Mambila jar

Equipped with a figurative spout, the container, which represents a human bust, is embellished with decorative motifs in relief. Ochre slip, kaolin and blue pigments. Slight shine.
Despite their small numbers, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men", in Fulani), settled in northwestern Cameroon, on either side of the Cameroon-Nigeria border, created a large number of masks and statues easily identifiable by their heart-shaped faces. Although the Mambila believe in a creator god named Chang or Nama, they worship only their ancestors. Their chiefs were buried in granaries like wheat because they were thought to symbolize prosperity. The Mambila are farmers and mainly cultivate coffee. Their masks and ...


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340.00

Mambila Tadep
Tribal art > African Statues > Mambila

Anthropomorphic figure of massive appearance, represented hunched over, head engulfed up to the chest, arms folded around a bust flaring out towards solid half-bent legs. The very particular face, in the shape of a heart, is crowned with a multitude of studs. Fine clay film locally cracked.
Cracks of desiccation.
Despite their small numbers, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men", in Fulani), settled in the northwest of Cameroon, have created a large number of masks and statues easily identifiable by their heart-shaped faces. Although the Mambila believe in a creator god named Chang or Nama, they worship only their ancestors. Their chiefs were buried in granaries like wheat because they were ...


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780.00

Dogon statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon statue

Declined in tubular volumes, this Dogon sculpture represents a mythical being, or an ancestor without facial features. The head evokes, for the Dogon, the egg of the world created by the word of the god Amma. A disk forms the shoulders, extended by fine arms, one of which points to the sky. The Dogon decorative motifs, in broken lines and rings, associated with traditional scarifications, are engraved on the whole. They refer to the Dogon cosmogony. Medium brown patina.

Carved for the most part on commission by a family, Dogon statues may also be the object of worship by the entire community. However, their functions remain little known. In parallel with Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lebe, relating to fertility, under the ...


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750.00

Hyena Bamana face mask
Tribal art > African mask > Bamana mask

Beautiful "V" geometry for this African animal mask associated with the secrets of the bush, endowed with a rectilinear machoîre. Between the horns, a prominence evokes the tuft of hair removed after the death of the animal. Deep dark patina, glossy, abraded on the reliefs. Established in central and southern Mali, in a savannah area, the Bambara, "Bamana" or "unbelievers", as the Muslims have named them, belong to the large Mande group, along with the Soninke and the Malinke. Mostly farmers, but also breeders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. Groups of Bambara artisans nyamakala , more specifically the blacksmiths named numu , are in charge of sculpting ritual objects, endowed with nyama , occult energy. Using fire and magical objects, the role of healer and diviner ...


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750.00



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