Tribal Art, online sale of tribal art, primitive art and primitive art
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The site Art Tribal offers a wide selection of tribal art objects, masks, statues, bronzes and everyday objects. All these tribal works are rigorously selected from international private collections.

Mangbetu drum
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Tribal art > Djembe TamTam > Mangbetu drum

A percussion musical instrument of the Mangbetu, this half-moon shaped monoxylean wooden idiophone has been fitted with a long slot that acts as a resonant opening. It has handles at each of the tapered ends and is also embellished with tapestry nails. Mahogany brown patina partially matted. Height on base : 30 cm. The Mangbetu kingdom produced architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, ornaments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The slit drum is not only a musical instrument that animates the dance but also a vector of speech, since it is used to communicate messages: invitations to gatherings, various announcements, etc... In Central ...


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Songye statue
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Tribal art > African fetish > Songye statue

Carved from a single block of carefully selected wood, equipped with its multiple accessories and ritual talismans consecrated by the nganga, this fetish sculpture presents a fascinating face reproducing the kifwebe mask of the Bwadi ka bifwebe society. . The bishimba magic charge, intended for protection, is generally lodged in the abdomen and in the summit horn. Reptile skin covers the head and forms the loincloth of the statue.
The fetish Songye, magic sculpture Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi), plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South ...


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Awale Luba
Tribal art > Usual african items > Awale Luba

"Mboko cup-bearing" statues frame this game of the awalé type from the mancala family. The apron is hollowed out with twenty-four cells, laid out in four rows. Stones, seeds, pebbles or even shells formed the pawns. Matte light brown patina, abrasions and slight chips.


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650.00

Boa basket
Tribal art > African mask > Boa basket

Rare set consisting of a basket on which are fixed a sculpted mask embellished with small bones and cowries. For the Boa, it would be a ritual altar for protection.
Grainy patina. Erosions, lacks. br /> Flanked by pierced lobes like the ear flaps of the Boa of the east, the "bavobongo", and a mouth lined with sparse teeth, this African mask gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the contrast of colors. Supposed to render invulnerable and with the aim of terrifying the enemy, the African mask kpongadomba or "Pongdudu" of the Boa was ordered by the chief kumu who offered it to the bravest warrior. It was then kept in his wife's hut. Close to the Mangbetu and the Zande, the Boa inhabit the savannah in the north of Democratic Republic of Congo. Some Boa ...


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380.00

Mumuye head
Tribal art > African mask > Mumuye head

This sculpture formed the top of a mumuye vertical crest mask. Masks of this nature, associated with agrarian ceremonies to promote harvests, health, and human fertility, were used by neighboring groups, Wurkun/Bikwin, Mumuye, and Jukun, established in the middle Benoué. The wearer of the mask was presumably balancing it on his head. br />
The face is topped with a crest evoking the hairstyles of the group. Elements are enhanced with polychrome pigments, and patterns associated with the scarifications in use are inscribed on the surface.
Satin patina, abrasions and erosions.
The 100,000 Adamawa language speakers form a group called Mumuye and are grouped into villages, dola, divided into two groups: those of fire ( tjokwa ) relating to blood and the color ...


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290.00

Luba jar
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Tribal art > African Jar > Luba jar

Luba container whose cephalomorphic neck is pierced with two holes. The plaited braid of the human motif elegantly rests on the upper part of the handle. The smooth sides are incised with decorative motifs, arranged in successive friezes.
Light golden brown slip.
The cradle of the Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River. They were born of a secession from the Songhoy ethnic group. In the 16th century they created a state, organized in decentralized chiefdoms, which stretched from the Kasai River to Lake Tanganyika. The chiefdoms cover a small territory with no real border which includes at most three villages.
Source "Africa, The Art of a Continent" ed. Prestel; "Luba" F. Neyt.


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Ashanti doll
Tribal art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Akuaba doll statuettes (plural Akua'mma) are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable thanks to their simplified structure. Their circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the face. Abraded matte patina.
This people considers the woman as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most common themes evoked in Ashanti woodcarvings. This ethnic group has built a relatively democratic society based on the moral value of the individual. The Ashanti founded a monarchy in the 17th century. The identities of the various Akan ethnic groups have been influenced by both Islam and Christianity.


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390.00

Mendé Mask
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Tribal art > African mask > Mendé Mask

The sowei form an idealized representation of female beauty seen through the Mende culture.They also embody aquatic spirits. This very old African mende mask is a copy of the type of masks named bundu the most important among the Mendé. It has a high bulging forehead occupying the upper half of a losangic face in which the features are concentrated in the lower area. The rings of the neck evoke an abundance of flesh that symbolizes prosperity. The bun headdress consists of fine braids picked up in side shells. The orifices bordering the contours were gnawed by the weight of the adornment over the different performances of the dancer. Painted black or tinted with a leaf brush, the mask was then rubbed with palm oil. Mate patina with a velvety touch. Localized abrasions, slight cracks, ...


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Doko Drum
Tribal art > Djembe TamTam > Doko Drum

Rare drum with Ngombe handle, in the shape of a barrel, established on feet resuming in miniature the stylized anthropomorphic morphology of the pipes in use in the group. It is decorated with coins from the 1930s, arranged in vertical lines, with regularity, on the sides. The object shows obvious signs of use.
The relatively limited artistic production of the Ngombe, Doko, or Likungu has been marked by the influence of neighboring groups, Ngbandi and Ngbaka. Their sculptures, mostly magical fetishes, would be used by the bendo soothsayer to aid hunting. The Ngombe migrated from Lake Victoria in East Africa. After dispersing, some of them settled among the Ngala on the banks of the Zaire River.
Ref. : "100 people of Zaire and their sculpture" M.L. Félix.


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750.00

Game of awale Mangbetu two-headed
Tribal art > Usual african items > Awale Mangbetu

Ex-collection Belgian African tribal art.
Creus of 28 alveoli, this awale game is part of the mancalas family of games. The foot is altered. The figurative motifs, in the form of carved heads, obey the stylistic canonical mangbetu and zande. Clear patina, slightly abraded. Small cracks. Established in the forest in northeastern Zaire, between Bomokandi and the River Uele, the Mangbetu kingdom was expressed through architectural works that fascinated European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, ornaments, pottery and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King Mangbetu Munza was so dubbed The cannibal king. The ethnologist G.A. Schweinfurth in 1870 described ...


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490.00

Dogon figure
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Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon figure

Sculpture illustrating the statuary from the central part of the Bandiagara cliff in Mali, Bombou-toro, and whose morphology presents common details with the so-called "Master of Ogol" works. Bracelets are engraved on the slender arms, patterns associated with body scarifications remain visible. Beautiful satin patina, eroded wood and cracks.
Carved for the most part on order placed by a family, Dogon statues can also be the object of worship on the part of the whole community when they commemorate, for example, the foundation of the village. However, their functions remain little known. Alongside Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lébé, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the Hogon, the Wagem, cult of the ancestors under the ...


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Fipa statue
Tribal art > African Maternity > Fipa statue

African motherhood depicting a character carrying a child. The eyes are encrusted with pearls while large ears frame a neutral countenance. Rough patina, residual ocher encrustations.
This piece of tribal art comes from the northeastern region of Tanzania, bordering Kenya, facing the Indian Ocean, where the Paré, Shamba, Zigua, and Mbugu tribes live. A relative homogeneity characterizes the productions of these groups, recalling some of the Madagascans and Bataks with whom, via maritime trade, contact could once have been established. This sculpture was probably used for didactic purposes during male initiations. She could also embody an ancestor or a spirit. Lit. : "Black African Tribal Art" J.B. Bacquart.


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380.00

Hemba Calabash
Tribal art > Usual african items > Hemba Calabash

These sculptures bankishi (sing. nkishi ) were used within the framework of the bugabo , a society dedicated to hunting, healing and war. A male figure referring to the ancestors springs from a calabash around which is wrapped a cord accessorized with feathers and dried fruit. The object rattles when shaken. Dark patina.
Height with base: 27 cm.

The Hemba have long been subject to the neighboring Luba empire, which has had a certain influence on their culture, their religion and their art. Ancestor worship is central to Hemba society. Mastering sculpture with talent, the Hemba have mainly produced statues of singiti ancestors, embodying chiefs, local warriors, or lineage ancestors whom they venerate in order to appease the spirits mizimus . A wide variety of ...


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360.00

Tripode Ethiopia Tabouret
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Tribal art > African Chair > Ethiopian tabouret

Beautiful glossy patina for the seat of this little old stool. Three large curved feet support the thick circular tray, the crack of which has been restored with a metal clip. Dark brown patina.
The Oromo are a people living in the Horn of Africa. They are found in Ethiopia and northern Kenya.
They began a pastoral migration to northern territories in the 15th century, facilitated by the ruptures caused by the conquests of Ahmed Gragn. During this process, they clump together and cultivate the local populations.

They are known for their stylized neck supports and generally have a nice symmetry.


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Ti wara crest
Tribal art > African mask > Ti wara crest

The Ti-wara in African art.
"Antelope" mask with balanced concentrated proportions, very soberly embellished with friezes engraved on the forehead. Traces of kaolin, smooth, satin patina, medium brown.

It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of an antelope, whose name ci wara means "wild of the earth. Carried at the top of the skull and held in place by a kind of small basket, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks traversed the field while leaping in order to drive out from this one the nyama, malefic emanations, and to detect any danger, or to flush out ...


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680.00

Tellem statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Tellem statue

This traditional African art object was made to order by a family and was in this case placed on the family altar Tiré Kabou. African tribal statues of the Dogon can also be the object of worship by the entire community when they commemorate, for example, the founding of the village. These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on ancestor altars and participate in various rituals including those of the seed and harvest periods. Their functions, however, remain little known. Influenced stylistically by the Tellem whom they replaced in the Bandiagara region from the 15th century, the Dogon adopted this same vertical position in their statuary. Inheritors of the Tellem works abandoned in the region, they adopted some of them that they resacralized to use in ...


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Lobi figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Lobi figure

Female statuette whose tip of the chin rests on the bust. The oval head offers large, flat strokes. The straight back reveals an arched buttocks and a slightly protruding abdomen on which the hands rest. The joined, stocky legs disappear into a circular base. The vigorous size, clearing the main planes, is representative of Lobi sculpture. Matte patina imprinted with probably libation residues.
Desication cracks.
This Bateba figure is supposed to embody a spirit of the bush, the Thil, and thus become an intermediary in the fight against sorcerers and all other evil forces. These spirits are represented by wooden or copper sculptures called Bateba (large or small, figurative or abstract, they adopt different attitudes that symbolize the particular power or talent that the ...


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750.00

Pende mask
Tribal art > African mask > Pende mask

Symbolizing the wild buffalo, the African mask panya ngombe adopts a stretched, stylized form. The ears, framing long horizontal eyelids, spring out in a point towards the outer corners, conferring a dynamic. The contours are indented with decorative diamond patterns. Copies larger than required by the tribal canon were intended to be hung in the chief's hut, and logically did not present any internal signs of use. Matte black patina. Height on base: 31 cm.
The western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the eastern people have settled on the banks of the Kasai downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, ...


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390.00

Kota reliquary
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Tribal art > African Reliquary > Kota reliquary

Ex-collection African tribal art Belgian
This guardian effigy of a reliquary, evoking the ancestors, adopts a headdress with flat shells ending in two short pendants. The flat face is divided into contrasting tones. The whole is plated with a network of copper and brass sheets that a fine nailing fixes to the wooden frame. This type of sculpture placed on the reliquary baskets played among the Kota the role of "medium" between the living and the dead and watched over their descendants. They are sometimes bifaces, the mbulu-viti, symbolizing the masculine and feminine aspect at the same time. In the exclusive presence of initiates, the major decisions of the clan were taken during ceremonies during which the reliquaries were taken out and used. In order to reactivate the magic ...


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Statue Teke
Tribal art > African fetish > Statue Teke

This clan ancestor figure is brought in to contain the mystical charge called Bonga. It was then wrapped in a textile that was to hold the load in its receptacle. The face is streaked with traditional scarifications. The clan leader had this type of sculpture adorning an altar. Brilliant cracked patina. Desication cracks.
Andeblis between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family, whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, ngantsed , kept the great protective fetish tring hated who oversaw all the ceremonies. It was the mighty sorcerer and soothsayer who charged magical elements, for ...


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450.00

Luba Stool
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Tribal art > African Chair > Luba Stool

The caryatid "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief" (Luba, Roberts) supporting the top of this stool named lupona, or kioni or kipona, kiona, has been treated in an unusual schematic way. The ovoid head, blind, offers summary features. This seat once formed the seat on which King mulopwe was enthroned. The seats were arranged on leopard skins during the investiture of the new leader. Only after sitting there did his speech take on a royal and divine character. Apart from these exceptional circumstances, the seats were not used and remained stored in undisclosed locations. Speckled dark brown patina, orange luster on the top. Indigenous restoration under the base (metal clip) Cracks and erosions. The cradle of the Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) is Katanga, more precisely the region ...


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