Tribal Art, online sale of tribal art, primitive art and primitive art
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The site Art Tribal offers a wide selection of tribal art objects, masks, statues, bronzes and everyday objects. All these tribal works are rigorously selected from international private collections.

Statue Metoko
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Metoko

It was during funerary rites that this figure appeared and was then installed on the tomb. Very geometric, the sculpture also seems to have been organized around the sex of the figure. Lozenge patterns punctuate the light-colored surface, on which there are residual inlays of white clay. Erosion and cracks.
Statues named Ibubi , belonging to the Nkumi, elder of the Bukota used as the figure kakungu for initiation rites of the male society, played a role during mediation in disputes. The Metoko and the Lengola, whose ritual sculptures are very similar, are peoples of the primary forest dedicated to the worship of a single God, a monotheism rare in Africa. Their society comprising three grades, the Bukota, structured daily life and welcomed both men and women. It ...


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Yombe Fetish
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Tribal art > African Statues > Yombe Fetish

Tribal statuette previously consecrated by the priest nganga , it has a magical charge lodged in the abdominal cavity blocked by glass. The load or bilongo consists of various ingredients from the natural environment including red clay, red wood powder tukula, white clay pembe... , but possibly human fragments such as teeth, nails, hair. This fetish of conspiracy, established on a pedestal, was therefore supposed to influence adversity. The circular pupils are encrusted with white clay. The face adopts a menacing appearance. The arms are positioned around the abdominal cavity and the back has a classic arch that protrudes the buttocks of the character. The headdress is characteristic of the statuary Beembé and Yombé, other tribes of the Kongo group. The ropes symbolize the action of ...


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Songye Fetish
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Tribal art > African Statues > Songye Fetish

Ex-collection Belgian tribal art.
This statuette is the result of cooperation between the nganga, the sculptor and the client. Sculpted according to the instructions of the ritual priest, the figure intended for the client is then encased with the elements bishimba intended to counter any evil force. In the case of the ci-versus fetish, the abdomen was hollowed out. The horns remain in number of three, of various sizes, an orifice is filled with textiles. The face is studded with upholstery nails. In African culture, metal has magical, therapeutic and apotropaic properties. The face that adopts the features of a middle-aged man recalls both the kifwebe mask. Dark satin patina.
The fetish Songye , magical sculpture Nkisi , nkishi (pl. mankishi ), plays the role of mediator ...


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Dan mask
Tribal art > African mask > Dan mask

For the Dan, or Yacouba, living in the west of the Ivory Coast and in Liberia, the "dü" force that would animate the world would manifest itself in the sculpted masks. It is in this way that she seeks to bring knowledge to man in order to support him, and first uses the channel of dreams. The spirits then indicate how to name the mask they wish to see made. These masks of different types are endowed with social, spiritual and political functions, often changing over time. Balanced, harmonious volumes, for this specimen of a dan déangled mask whose lozenge-shaped mouth suggesting luscious lips forms a constant, and whose slit eyes, here edged in white, belong to the déanglé type, mask portrait. It is embellished here with a thick braided hairstyle, strands of raffia and a textile ...


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490.00

Tanzania Mask
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Tribal art > African mask > Tanzania Mask

This rare mask depicting a stranger was once implanted with human hair that remains dotted on the skull, eyebrows, chin and mustache. The realistic face was painted dark red. Desication cracks, xylophageal fingerprints now eradicated.
In the southern region of Tanzania's coastline, around Dar-es-Salam, a relatively homogeneous group produced most of the artistic productions. It includes Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is a territory covering southern Tanzania as far as Mozambique, home to some Makonde and Yao, Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua. In northeastern Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Maasai, Iraqw, Gogo, and Hehe have an artistic production with similarities to Malagasy and Batak art, which could be explained by trade by sea. Luo, Kuria, ...


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Statue Fon
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Fon

This straight statue whose hands disappear into the hip block and the parallel legs apart rest on a promontory with large globular eyes giving it a threatening character. The sculpture was made by the blacksmith fon according to the instructions of the soothsayer named fa . The colorful note of earrings brings a surprising freshness to the disturbing fetish whose body is further pierced with scattered metal blades and tips reminiscent of the asen . The wood is light, with dark residual inlays, the surface regularly criss-crossed by desication.
Mr. Brunel, a chemist by training, travelled the world before becoming passionate about Africa, which he discovered through his eldest daughter. Zaire, Kenya, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Guinea,... By the time of his death, he had accumulated nearly ...


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Tabwa Mask
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Tribal art > African mask > Tabwa Mask

Statue associated with therapeutic cult type Hamba , this sculpture Chokwe or Lwena embodies a female ancestor supposed to guarantee fertility or healing. These figures were arranged around the altar muyombo, a tree at the foot of which sacrifices and offerings were once made. Sculptures such as figures made in sticks or poles ( Mbunji or mbanji), planted in the ground, were also associated. The related ethnic groups had the same type of altar, a witness before which rituals, oaths and important transactions were concluded. (Source: Chokwe, B. Wastiau)The character who also depicts the second wife of legendary chef Chibinda Ilunga sports a bulging hairstyle like a helmet and metal adornments. Smooth patina with matte granular pigments. Abrasions of the character's fingers. Xylophage ...


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Pende Statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Pende Statue

Statue depicting a woman wearing a helmet mask. Polychrome satin patina. Erosions.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the realistic Mbuya masks, produced every ten years, take on a festive function and embody different characters. The masks of initiation and those of power, the minganji, represent the ancestors and occur successively during the same ceremonies, agricultural festivals, initiation and circumcision rituals mukanda , enthronement of the leader. Governed by heads of families, the Djogo, with a priestly function, the ...


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750.00

Luba statue
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Tribal art > African Maternity > Luba statue

Rare Luba statue of imposing size, standing on spread, semi-flexed legs. So-called "ear-shaped" scarifications, "tactile mnemonic code", cover the bust, enhancing the curves. This type of figure was also used in the context of fertility rituals: young women lacking breast milk came to touch the chest of the statue in the hope of breastfeeding more abundantly. These mothers then spoke audibly to the ancestor indicating that their grandchildren lacked milk. Dark satin patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, thus the name (Baluba, which means “the Lubas”). The chiefdoms cover a small territory without any real border which includes at most three villages. The Luba of Kasai were subjected to ...


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Songye fetish
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye fetish

Magical nkishi (pl. mankishi) sculpture of the Songye whose face resembles the features of kifwebe masks. Depending on the case, she would also be in charge of the bishimba lodged in the horn or in the bead surrounding the bust. For the Songye, the addition of various accessories, metal, trinkets, etc... reinforced the "power" of the fetish. Glossy patina. Erosions and cracks.

These protective fetishes for homes are among the most popular in Africa. The Nkisi plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is organized in a ...


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690.00

Yoruba sculpture
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Tribal art > African Rider > Yoruba sculpture

Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). This African altar sculpture, allowing communication with the afterlife according to the Yoruba, depicts one of the many female goddesses, the earth goddess Onilé ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources, and linked to the powerful Ogboni society among theYoruba Egba and Ijebu. She could also symbolize Orunmila, goddess of divination. Hairstyle and integumentary ornaments also indicate the social rank of the character. Thick matte polychrome patina, locally cracked, cracks.

The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of ...


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Kuba Box
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Kuba Box

The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. The Leus live in the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural characteristics with the Bushoong of the Kuba country. Both groups adorn their prestige objects with similar motifs. The only ethnic group created a variety of lidded containers in which individual goods were stored, the Kuba adorned them with patterns similar to those of embroidered textiles. The top lid that forms here like a toque is engraved with a large decorative frieze. It rests on a flared pot, tightened in the center, under which an animal symbol forms a stylized pattern in relief. Very nice refined object, equipped with a clever system: a small internal hook allows to fit the lid on the edge ...


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Mumuye statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Mumuye statue

The fascinating design of the mumuye statues is illustrated here in a medium-sized version of beautiful symmetry. The ears distended by labrets envelop a slender face on which are traced summary features. Glossy dark patina. Desication cracks.
The statuary emanating from the northwestern region of the middle Benoué, from the Kona Jukun, to the Mumuye and up to the Wurkun populations is distinguished by a relative absence of ornamentation and a refined stylization. The 100,000 Adamawa language speakers form a group called Mumuye and are grouped into villages, dola, divided into two groups: those of fire (tjokwa) relating to blood and the color red, guardians of the Vabong cult, from among whom are elected the heads,and those of water, (tjozoza), related to humidity and the ...


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790.00

Low Masque
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Tribal art > African mask > Low Masque

This rare mask, named Gela , Geh-Naw , of Liberia's Bassa ethnic group, a talisman mask, has a crusty agglomerate on top, imprisoning magical-purpose elements, twigs, metal, textiles and other materials. The triangular chin, curved forward, is lined with metal slats, echoing the inlays that enhance the mouth. The lines and scarifications, dug in the wood, are coated with white clay.
The Liberia's Bassa group is based in the coastal region, particularly around Grand-Bassa. Its culture and artistic production have been influenced by the Dan and the neighbouring Kpellé, who are Mandé-speaking. The Bassa have women's and men's initiation societies, including the chu-den-zo that gave birth to this type of sculptural work. The mask geh-naw , or gela , was on the dancer's forehead, ...


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Dogon table
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Tribal art > African Chair > Dogon table

Traditional African furniture.
A figure of a ram supports the top of this sculpted monoxyl table, polished with use, offering a light brown golden patina.
Exceptional piece, acquired in situ.
Desiccation cracks.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya ). The villages are often perched at the top of the scree on the side of the hills, according to a unique architecture. The history of the migrations and settlements of the Dogon (ten main groups, fifteen different languages), bears on ...


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Hungaan Fetish
Tribal art > African fetish > Hungaan Fetish

Very expressive sculpture of a small, stocky character, represented with hands united under the chin, with characteristics also kwésé, according to the hatching of the face. Orifices have been pierced on either side of the head for possible suspension, sex for ritual purposes. Grainy velvety patina, partially abraded, desication cracks.
The Kwésé are established among other tribes such as the Mbala and the Hungaan, along the banks of the Kwango River in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their sculpture is inspired by that of their neighbors and sometimes made by the Mbalas at the request of the Kwese.
The headdress shares great similarities with the mukote headdress which, among the Western Pende with whom the Mbala shared mukanda circumcision rituals, became a symbol of ...


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480.00

Calao statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Calao statue

Sculpture associated with the primordial bird that is one of the five animals of the Senoufo cosmogony, the first stage of Senoufo creation, and more precisely the hornbill. Evoked for morphological and behavioral criteria, it decorates in an emblematic way, in its miniature version, many Senufo African art objects. Its long beak, "interpreted as the figuration of the male sexual organ" perpetuating the life of the community, comes back to rest on the animal's abdomen. Enhanced with chevrons and parallel lines, the matte patina is velvety. Desication cracks, losses on the base.
Linked to the Poro society which initiated young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years, this sculpture of Setien was placed in the sacred enclosure , where , ...


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Ibibio Puppet
Tribal art > Puppets > Ibibio Puppet

Statue of the "colon" type, whose squat anatomy is embellished with long movable arms. The round head wears a headdress dividing into two lobes, the sides of the face are notched with orifices arranged at regular intervals. Mat patina of use, particularly velvety. Desication cracks, erosions.
The Ibibios, people of West Africa mainly present in the south-east of Nigeria (State of Akwa Ibom), are also present in Ghana, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. Secret societies are numerous among the Ibibio settled west of the Cross River. Without a centralized government, their social organization is comparable to that of the neighboring Igbo. Ancestor worship is under the authority of the highest-ranking members of the Ekpo. The latter use masks such as the idiok, related to fallen spirits, ...


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490.00

Yoruba head
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Tribal art > African bronze > Yoruba head

In African art, the artistic movement of which these sculptures are a part bears the name of the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba. This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funeral effigies in bronze but also in terracotta. The parallel folds traced on the neck would evoke the folds of flesh of the prosperous notables, and the hollowed out parts which accompany it were to be used to fix the beaded veil of the king. The parallel lines of the face represent the traditional scarifications. The openings around the mouth presumably represented a beard created by the ...


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Igbo statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Igbo statue

br>Intended to be placed in the obu (Sing.: obi), houses of the men of the Cross River, these statues figured in a classical posture formed the tops of pillars . The bodies bear body patterns named "uli". Regional body markings, tattoos and scarifications indicated the rank reached in the initiation society. The thick kaolin patina is partially abraded. The Igbo culture has its origins in the mythology of the Nri Kingdom of Nigeria, according to which the gods brought believers palm oil, cassava, and medicines made from yams.
The Igbo live in the forest in southeastern Nigeria. They managed to combine a deep sense of individuality with an equally strong sense of belonging to the group. Their political system is complex and little known. The village is the largest social unit, the ...


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Luluwa figure
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Tribal art > African Maternity > Luluwa figure

Multiple symbolic scarifications are inscribed on the body of the sculpted effigy with a protective vocation. This highly detailed statue, carrying two children, features a locally blackened orange patina. A summit excrescence depicting high braids rises from the headdress. Beautiful work featuring a balanced alternation of protruding reliefs.
The different types of Luluwa, Lulua, or even Béna Lulua statues, with multiple scarifications, glorify local chiefs, motherhood, fertility and the female figure. This sculptural art was subject to the influences of neighboring ethnic groups (Chokwe, Luba, Kuba, ...)
It is in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Lulua, or Béna Lulua, settled from West Africa. Their social structure, based on caste, is similar to that ...


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