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Tribal art - African Chair:

Essential pieces of tribal art and true masterpieces, these objects are, today, used to decorate an interior. Originally of a purely usual function, the stools were used by the notables of the village. These objects are generally composed of one or more statues supporting the seat.


Malinke Seats
Tribal art > African Chair > Malinke Seats

These models of prestigious seats, robust, very elaborate, and decorated with refinement, were intended for chefs. This type of high chairs collected in Guinea were indeed reserved for sofas, warrior dignitaries who fought alongside Samory Touré. The Malinke have spread from Senegal to Guinea Bissau, northern Sierra Leone, Liberia and northwestern Côte d'Ivoire. Under their influence, the Toma or Loma of Guinea carved similar seats. It is rare to be able to present them in pairs. Decorative motifs, chiseled in sheets of copper and tin, adorn the elements of the seats. Everything is in excellent condition, except for one of the carved figurines referring to the ancestors, missing on the front of one of them. Few desication cracks. Ref. : "Seats of Black Africa" ed.5Continents (p.82 and ...


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3900.00

Dogon Stool
Tribal art > African Chair > Dogon Stool

Reduced version for this old Dogon stool supported by four geometric figures embodying the mythical ancestor Nommo. The contours of the flat, oval seat are engraved with symbolic linear motifs. Large metal staples were used to consolidate the structure. Velvety matte patina, abrasions. Cracks.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the south-west of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (north-west of Ouahigouya ). The villages are often perched on top of the scree on the side of the hills, according to a unique architecture. The history of Dogon migrations and settlements (about ten ...


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490.00

Throne Baga
Tribal art > African Chair > Throne Baga

This large carved seat where the seat rests on the back of an aquine figure forms a rare piece. It is embellished with large polychrome motifs. Patina glossed by use on the supporting areas, some cracks of desication.
Mêlés aux Nalu and Landuman , the Baga live along the coasts of Guinea-Bissau in areas of swamps flooded six months a year. These Baga groups based on the coast and living from rice farming are made up of seven subgroups, including the Baga Kalum, Bulongic, Baga sitem, Baga Mandori, etc. They believe in a creative god called Nagu, Naku, which they do not represent, and which is accompanied by a male spirit whose name is Somtup. Apart from the famous Nimba mask, they have created a powerful mask, hybrid snake, gazelle, chameleon and crocodile, with the aim of ...


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1250.00

Nkanu chair
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Tribal art > African Chair > Nkanu chair

Prestigious seat carried by five caryatid miniatures constituting the uprights. A sculpted figure whose head protrudes hugs the back that she grips with her hands. Aluminum appliqués, underlined with nails, form symbolic animal motifs.

Abrasions, slight losses.
The Nkanu, from the Kongo group like the Zombo, live from agriculture along the Lufimi River. Their villages are grouped in groups of four or five under the authority of a local chief directing the heads of families. Their artistic production is mainly linked to the "kimeki" initiation rites and the nkanda circumcision: statues of drummers, masks, hut panels, statuettes dedicated to therapeutic rites. The sculpted objects bear motifs intended for the instruction of young initiates. Lit. : "100 People of ...


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Chokwe Seat
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Tribal art > African Chair > Chokwe Seat

Among the feasts of dignitaries, this stool with a cephalomorphic motif illustrates the importance given to the prestige of its owner. The protection of ancestors is invoked thanks to the sculpted effigy of Chibinda Ilunga, hunter and mythical hero, founder of the Chokwé ethnic group. The chiefs had a major function in the rites of propitiation intended for the hunting and fertility of women, the objects being decorated with this figure therefore presumably having a protective function. The flared seat rests on a circular base, and the walls are engraved with geometric patterns while a handle is fitted at the back.
Grey black, semi-mate. Cracks.
Paisiblely settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they ...


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Tripode Ethiopia Tabouret
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Tribal art > African Chair > Ethiopian tabouret

Beautiful glossy patina for the seat of this little old stool. Three large curved feet support the thick circular tray, the crack of which has been restored with a metal clip. Dark brown patina.
The Oromo are a people living in the Horn of Africa. They are found in Ethiopia and northern Kenya.
They began a pastoral migration to northern territories in the 15th century, facilitated by the ruptures caused by the conquests of Ahmed Gragn. During this process, they clump together and cultivate the local populations.

They are known for their stylized neck supports and generally have a nice symmetry.


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Luba Stool
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Tribal art > African Chair > Luba Stool

The caryatid "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief" (Luba, Roberts) supporting the top of this stool named lupona, or kioni or kipona, kiona, has been treated in an unusual schematic way. The ovoid head, blind, offers summary features. This seat once formed the seat on which King mulopwe was enthroned. The seats were arranged on leopard skins during the investiture of the new leader. Only after sitting there did his speech take on a royal and divine character. Apart from these exceptional circumstances, the seats were not used and remained stored in undisclosed locations. Speckled dark brown patina, orange luster on the top. Indigenous restoration under the base (metal clip) Cracks and erosions. The cradle of the Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) is Katanga, more precisely the region ...


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Bamileke Seat
Tribal art > African Chair > Bamileke Seat

In African art, the Bamiléké demonstrate their know-how through the use of multicolored beads.
This monoxyle seat having the appearance of a table, named rü mfo among the Bamum, presents human figurative motifs enhanced by contrasting colours. A basic structure is carved in wood and then covered, above a raffia canvas, with a latticework of imported multicolored beads. br>
Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North West Province of Cameroon, the Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun, or Bamum and Bamileke. Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations, secret societies, are organized around the Fon who has broad powers. Among the Bamilékés of Sudano-Bantu origin, as in other ethnic ...


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750.00

Chokwe Bed
Tribal art > Head rest > Chokwe Bed

This bed consists of a concave board established on four legs, a sculpted neck support acting as a pillow. The effigy in the round adorning the head of the bed probably represents the tribal chief Chibinda Ilunga, hunter and mythical hero, founder of the Chokwé ethnic group, wearing the cipenya-mutwe, the objects being decorated of this figure having a protective function. The contours are inlaid with upholstery nails.
Brown patina encrusted with ochre.
Native restorations. Desication erosions and cracks.
Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwé never fully adopted these new social and ...


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780.00

Luluwa chair
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Tribal art > African Chair > Luluwa chair

The backrest and legs of this dignitary's chair take up the signs associated with the body scarification of the ethnic group. The face of the figure with the ringed neck on top of the seat also features salient motifs. According to Rik Ceyssens in "Congo Masks" (p.156 . ed. M.L.Félix) and as attested by the sketches of H.M. Lemme who accompanied Frobenius on his travels to the Congo, this model of scarification in loops was then widespread in different Luluwa subgroups in 1905. The Bakwa also had this type of tribal scarring. Comfortable seating. Glossy patina, shaded brown, orange reflections. Erosions, slight superficial cracks.
The different types of Luluwa, Lulua, or Bena Lulua statues, presenting multiple scarifications, glorify the local chiefs, maternity, ...


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Songye Stool with Janiform Leg
Tribal art > African Chair > Songye stool

In the south-west of the Congo, and in Angola and Zambia, each chief had a seat whose foot consisted of a female caryatid, an image of fecundity, fertility, and filiation. matrilineal. However, it is a kifwebe mask which replaces the caryatid here. This type of seat could also serve as a pedestal for Songye mankishi (sing. nkishi) fetishes. The seat here is concave. These seats were sometimes charged with a bishimba at the level of the head, the umbilicus or in the base.
Golden beige satin patina. Cracks and slight losses.
The Songye came from the Shaba region in the DRC and settled between the Lualaba River and the Sankuru River in the middle of savannah and forests. They are governed by the yakitenge and by local chiefs. The Bwadi secret society, however, counterbalances ...


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450.00

Boraati" Ethiopia neck support
Tribal art > Head rest > Sidamo neck support

African headrests come in an almost infinite variety: this type of African headrest, at the same time a stool, has a dark glossy patina. This massive block with a gently curved oval top was probably made by the Sidama or Gurage people of southern and southwestern Ethiopia. The latter are among the eighty ethnic groups in Ethiopia who produced various neck rests for individual use called yagerteras, or "pillows of my country" or "Boraati" ("tomorrow you").
Slight cracks.
Over time, the realization becoming more complex until becoming real small masterpieces of sculpture, they also became individual objects of prestige and power, placed on family or collective altars. These objects were initially intended to protect the elaborate hairstyles of their owner (man or woman) ...


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280.00

Carved table with Dogon ram caryatid
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Tribal art > African Chair > Dogon table

Traditional African furniture.
A figure of a ram supports the top of this sculpted monoxyl table, polished with use, offering a light brown golden patina.
Exceptional piece, acquired in situ.
Desiccation cracks.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya ). The villages are often perched at the top of the scree on the side of the hills, according to a unique architecture. The history of the migrations and settlements of the Dogon (ten main groups, fifteen different languages), bears on ...

Fragment of a Luba Lupona stool
Tribal art > African Chair > Luba stool

Sacrality of the sculpted seats, prestige regalia, in primitive African art .
A female figure supporting the circular plate of a seat, forms the "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief" (Luba, Roberts). This stool named lupona , or kioni, kipona , kiona , according to the sources, constitutes the meeting point of the sovereign, his people, and protective spirits and ancestors, where past and present are symbolically and spiritually mingled. It was once the seat on which the king was enthroned. The seats were arranged on leopard skins when the new leader was inaugurated. It was only after being seated there that his address assumed a royal and divine character. Apart from these exceptional circumstances, the seats were not used and remained stored in secret places. ...


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280.00

Kanyok stool
Tribal art > African Chair > Kanyok stool

Carved in a dense wood, this seat figures a human head, offering sketchy features, and carrying a cup that forms the circular seat. Patina of use, significant erosion and cracks from desiccation. Living in the east of the Luba kingdom on the banks of the Mbujimayi, and having adopted part of the Luba culture, the Kanyok, Kanioc, or Bena Kanioka, created prestigious objects, such as water pipes, neck rests, sticks, and stools, and are especially famous for statuettes represented in different postures, made of dark wood and wearing bun hairstyles.  According to the Kanyok religion, the human being is composed of three parts: body, soul and spirit.  They believe in a supreme being called Tang a Ngoy.  The initiation of young people traditionally included, in addition to circumcision, the ...


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390.00

Kusu stool
Tribal art > African Chair > Kusu stool

Among the traditional sculptures reserved for dignitaries , this eroded seat that a figure embodying a clan ancestor or mythical hero supports. The statuette evokes the Songye and Hemba statues. Particularity of the Kusu, the face extending with a triangular beard.
Velvety surface.
Desiccation crack.
The Kusu settled on the left bank of the Lualaba have indeed borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and Hemba and possess a caste system similar to that of the Luba .  The Hemba on the other hand have settled in southeastern Zaire on the right bank of the Lualaba River. Once under the domination of the Luba , these farmers and hunters practice ancestor worship by means of effigies long attributed to the Luba. In this region, between the Bembe, Boyo, Hemba, ...


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950.00

Nyamézi Throne
Tribal art > African Chair > Nyamézi Throne

This chair, or throne, on three legs, with a female figure forming the backrest, materializes a concept of fecundity and lineage. The hollowed out eyes were usually encrusted with white pearls. The size of the ears contrasts with a classical physiognomy. Shaded, veined patina. Abrasions.
The Nyamwezi , Nyamezi , form the largest group among the tribes living in north central Tanzania. Coming from diverse origins, although sharing similar cultural specificities, their ritual and artistic production consequently presents very different formal aspects. The cult of ancestors and chiefs, of major importance within their culture, has left its mark on their statuary. The Sukuma and Nyamezi produced statues represented in a static position, some of which, with their filiform limbs, ...


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950.00

Double Kuba neck support
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Tribal art > African Chair > Tabouret Kuba

Original design, reserved for a couple according to some, this neck rest stands out thanks to its curved double support. The glossy supports, supported by three colonial feet emerging from a rectangular base, are engraved with geometric patterns arranged in regular triangles. This piece of furniture, widely distributed throughout the African continent, could have different uses: "dream support" preserving elaborate hairstyles, but also transportable seating, sometimes deliberately unstable in order to be able to cradle children, the base sometimes forming tablet, this utilitarian object, among some tribes of South Africa, became an object of seduction offered to the future wife.
Smooth, dark patina. Localized erosions.
The Kuba of the Democratic Republic of Congo, established ...


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Luba Seat
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Tribal art > African Chair > Luba Seat

Sacredness of the carved seats, regalia of prestige, in the primitive African art. A severely stylized caryatid supports the circular tray. The female figure is the "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief"( Luba, Roberts). This tabouret named lupona ,or kioni ,kipona , kiona , depending on the source, constitutes the meeting point of the ruler, his people, and the protective spirits and ancestors, where past and present are symbolically and spiritually intermingled. It was once the seat on which the king was enthroned. The seats were placed on leopard skins during the investiture of the new chief. It was only after sitting on it that his speech took on a royal and divine character. Apart from these exceptional circumstances, the seats were not used and remained stored in secret ...


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Dogon stool with caryatids
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Tribal art > African Chair > Dogon stool

Circular monoxyle seat in the center of which caryatids, arranged around a central pillar, support the upper plate. The contours are engraved with jagged friezes, a symbol related to water and creation. The wood is polished by use at the level of the seat. Cracks and erosions testify to the life of this original piece. The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, esotericism, myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). The villages are often perched on the top of scree on the side of hills, according to a unique architecture. The history of the migrations and settlements of the Dogon (about ...


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Tchokwe prestigious stool
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Tribal art > African Chair > Tabouret Chokwe

Ex-collection French tribal art.
Among the chef's regalia, this stool illustrates the importance attached to the prestige of its owner. The protection of ancestors is invoked thanks to the sculpted effigies playing the role of caryatids supporting the used circular seat. While one of them is like a Chokwe tribal leader who could be Chibinda Ilunga, a mythical hunter and hero, founder of the Chokwé ethnic group, wearing his large side winged headdress cipenya-mutwe, the second depicts an 18th century Portuguese settler. The chiefs had a major function in the rites of propitiation intended for the hunting and fertility of women, the objects being decorated with this figure therefore presumably having a protective function. Old prints of upholstery nails. Desication cracks.


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