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Tribal art - African fetish:

Fetishes are emblematic objects in primitive African art. Used by fetishers and marabouts, they are linked to many occult practices such as those used by voodoo.


Solongo Kongo fetish statue
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Tribal art > African fetish > Solongo Fetish

Power fetishes in African art.
This naturalist figure with an aggressive gesture has an oval face characteristic of the Solongo of Angola, the latter supplying the Kongo clans. The glassy gaze of the pupils at the pinhead is wide open, which is the prerogative of an elder. Indeed, only middle-aged people can stare at us with such insistence in order to alert us to problems or odds. (The Kongo Gesture)
Placed on the abdomen, in a quadrangular cavity blocked by a glass, ingredients constitute a magical charge, whose iron nails that lard the piece strengthen the power. Clay libatory residues clumped on the surface, locally draped with textile strips.
Patine mate, kaolin libation residues.

In the Kongo kingdom, nganga took care of the rituals by activating a ...

Statue of Congo Nkishi
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue of Congo

Removable arms, fixed horizontally, give a defensive attitude to this Kongo fetish. It is also fitted with an abdominal cavity. Magical ingredients (bilongo), for therapeutic or protective purposes, were to be introduced by the nganga . The Vili produced a variety of sculptures for individual use nkisi , to which multiple virtues were attributed. Wide-eyed eyes symbolize foresight in a face wearing a flat hat. A red textile, highlighted with a nailing, drapes the bust, abdomen and skirt. Patine mate.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary ...


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Mossi Biga fertility charm
Tribal art > African fetish > Biga doll

Anthropomorphic figure in bronze evoking a young Mossi woman. A ritual statuette supposed to help in conception, it was made in metal by the Mossi blacksmith, who was also in charge of the carved wooden examples. The use of dolls by young African women is not exclusively within the context of initiation. When menstruation appears, the young girl is considered as a potential mother. In many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is then done through initiation rites. Wooden figures are then carved, some reflecting both genders, often dressed in beads and clothes. During the period of seclusion, the doll, which becomes a child that requires daily feeding, washing and anointing, becomes the girl's only companion. After the initiation, they will be carried on the back of the women, or ...


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385.00

Dogon Ritual Sculpture
Tribal art > African fetish > Dogon Altar

Created with great sensitivity, this sculpture, which belonged to a lineage, reflects one of the many facets of the Dogon worldview. The statuette at the top represents the incarnation of an ancestor, the ladder allowing the ascent of spirits to the afterlife. The gradations also form an image of the different stages of an individual's life toward the ultimate goal. The gobo , iron hook, is stuck into the wood, recalling the sacred role of the blacksmith. Grainy sacrificial patina, light chips.
The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule, was charged with studying in depth the rites of this population established in the region of the Bandiagara cliffs. The Dogon are thought to be composed of several peoples who found refuge there following repeated droughts or ...


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680.00

Fetish statue Nkisi Vili
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Tribal art > African fetish > Vili Fetish

Ex American tribal art collection.

Consecrated by the nganga, endowed with a magic charge (bilongo) housed in a box closed by a mirror, this statuette meets the criteria of nksi objects. The Vili produced a variety of sculptures of individual use nkisi , to which multiple virtues were attributed. The glazed eyes, encircled with resin, symbolize clairvoyance in a face with naturalistic features. Various accessories are present, some of which would accentuate the power of the object, metal in the form of a padlock, basketry backpack lined with textile, headdress made of leather, strips of fabric and feathers. Eroded base. Chocolate shiny patina.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo, led by the king ...


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Kongo Sundi fetish statuette
Tribal art > African fetish > Statuette Nsundi

In addition to their weapons and prestige objects and their funerary sculpture, the Sundi made use, individually and collectively, of conjuring fetishes equipped with a magical charge. The latter, protruding, takes the form of an amalgam or bilongo generally consisting of various ingredients from, among other things, the natural environment including red clay, red wood powder tukula, white clay pembe... Crusty patina. Cracks and slight lacks.
The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, headed by the king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory and copper trade and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified ...


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390.00

Statue Nkondi Solongo
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Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo Fetish

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Power betiches nkonde in African art.
This naturalistic figure has an oval face characteristic of the Solongo of Angola, the latter supplying the Kongo clans. The glassy gaze of the pinheaded wards is wide open, which "constitutes the prerogative of an elder. Indeed, only the middle-aged can stare at us with such insistence in order to alert us to problems or blunders." ("The Kongo Gesture")
Placed on the abdomen, in a quadrangular cavity sealed with glass, various ingredients constitute a magical charge.
Matt, grainy patina, clay residue.

In the Kongo kingdom, the nganga performed rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was later used to refer to notions of "sacred" or "divine". The most influential ...


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Fetish Boccio, Botchio, Fon
Tribal art > African fetish > Statuette Vodou

This feminine figure collected at Porot Novo is devoid of ritual accessories. She springs from a fragment of wood on narrow legs. In the same axis, the bust is framed by half-bent arms that seem to be tightened on the abdomen in a protective gesture. Positioned high up, the small chest is pointed. An enigmatic face surmounts the whole. Weathered wood, granular furrowed surface of soft and satiny texture. Blackish prints resulting from libations.
The botchio (from bo : "evil spell" in Fon, and tchio , "corpse") erected at the top of a pole was erected at the entrance of the village or a house in order to keep away from it any threat, physical or spiritual. Some of them took minimalist forms, barely sketched around a central trunk. The multitude of gods fon (the vodun), ...


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620.00

Songye Nkisi fetish statue
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Tribal art > African fetish > Songye Fetish

African statue Nkisi , nkishi (pl. mankishi )of the Songye, which has a head with stylized features like the kifwebe mask. The arms are positioned around a protruding umbilicus pointing beneath the textile of a red dress, providing, as was customary, space to grasp the sculpture with metal hooks. Here, the magical charge bishimba has probably been introduced at the top of the head from which a horn rises. Various ritual accessories also embellish the sculpture. Golden brown speckled patina. Eroded base.br> These protection fetishes for homes are among the most popular in Africa. The Nkisi plays the role of mediator between god and men, responsible for protecting against various evils. The larger figures are the collective property of an entire village, and the smaller figures ...


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Bemba fetish statuette
Tribal art > African Statues > Statuette Bemba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
Small figurine finely detailed and glossy by the manipulations, it would embody a twin bampundu kept by the surviving child, or one of the spouses of the mythical couple who were stored on an altar. The scarifications of the face here are punctiform, in discreet horizontal hatching on the bust. Shaded patina in the browns.
The Bemba, Bambembas, from Maniema, claim to be of Luba origin and settled on the shores of Lake Moero, near Zambia, and Lake Tanganyka. The Bemba participated in the 19th century in the slave trade by allying themselves with the slave king Msiri. Colonial policy dispersed them in the twentieth century. Their leader now reigns in Kasama, Zambia. They believe in a supreme god, Lesa, worship nature spirits, Ngulu, a ...


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380.00

Kongo Nkisi Fetish Dog
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Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo Fetish

Animal figure Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi )in which a magic charge bishimba is concealed. It is contained in a glass cavity placed on the back of the animal. The power of the fetish, according to local beliefs, was further accentuated by the presence of various accessories, such as nails, cords, metal. Among the Kongo, the dog, renowned for its knowledge of the supernatural world, had a role of mediator between the living and the dead. br /> The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo, led by the king Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its apogee in the 16th century with the trade of ivory, copper and slaves. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with codified gestures related to their vision ...


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Songye Nkisi fetish statuette
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Tribal art > African fetish > Songye Fetish

This carved figure Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi )is embellished with feathers at the place where the top horn used to be. Her angular face is powerfully expressive. The magic charge bishimba was introduced into the skull cavity if the abdomen did not have it. The power of the fetish would be further enhanced by the presence of accessories, metal rings in this case. Light wood coated with a locally abraded black patina.
These protection fetishes for homes are among the most popular in Africa. The Nkisi plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the sixteenth century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left ...

Statuette Suku Kiteke
Tribal art > African fetish > Fetish Suku

Ex-collection of British African tribal art.

A crouching posture for this figure supporting with his hands an imposing head with a thick snub-nosed "muzzle", evoking an evil spirit named kiteke. The strange cylindrical ears are also a notable feature. In neighboring Kongo clans, the naked, crouching posture, sondama , evokes an emergency action, attacking enemies in a supernatural way. Glossy patina. Cracks of desiccation. Lacks on a foot.
The Suku and Yaka ethnic groups, which are geographically very close in the southwest of the Democratic Republic of Congo, have the same social and political structure and similar cultural practices. They can only be differentiated by their stylistic variations. Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of formidable warriors, Yaka ...


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350.00

Fetish statue Teke Mpwau janiform
Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Teke

This clan ancestor figure was arranged to contain the mystical charge called "Bonga". It was draped with skin and textile to hold the charge in its receptacle. The faces are streaked with traditional scarification. The chief of the clan had this type of sculpture that adorned an altar. Golden brown patina. Lacks and erosions.
Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized in chiefdoms whose chief was often chosen from among blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right of life or death over his family, whose importance determined its prestige. The chief of the clan, ngantsié, kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié, who supervised all the ceremonies. It was the powerful healer wizard and soothsayer who "charged" ...


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390.00

Fetish Boli Bambara
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Tribal art > African fetish > Fetish Boli

This sculpture of a hunchbacked quadruped with a tail with an opening, has a thick, dark, blackish, hardened earthen layer impregnated with sacrificial elements, on which light-colored drips are outlined.
Called boli ( pl. boliw ), buffalo, in African tribal art, this fetish of variable size plays a central role in the ritual life of the Mandingo region. There are pocket "Boliw", and others that belong to chieftaincies, initiation societies such as the male initiation associations Kono and Komo whose members progress through a process spanning several decades, and even to states. The main function of a boli is to accumulate and control the natural life force called nyama for the spiritual benefit of the community . Used as altars or performed during dance performances, they ...


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Senoufo Fetish
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Tribal art > African Statues > Senoufo Fetish

An ovoid object extended by a long ringed neck and surmounted by a stylized bird's head. The curved beak of the animal gracefully returns to marry the handle of the sculpture. Four sheep horns protrude in a star shape around the volume composing the base. The hole made on the neck suggests the initial presence of a carrying handle. This object would form a fetish object for ritual use. Matt crusty patina, cracks and crazing.
Total height including base: 85 cm.
The Senoufos, the name given to them by French settlers, are mostly composed of farmers who have dispersed between Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, and Burkina Faso. Councils of elders, led by an elected chief, administer the Senoufo villages. Governed by matrilineal traditions, they are composed of clusters of dwellings ...


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Senoufo divination figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Senoufo figure

Ex-collection of Belgian African tribal art.
Straight back, legs spread slightly bent, this sculpted figurine offers to the eye a protruding bust between hands placed at an angle. The coiffure in crest on a shaved skull ends in the nape of the neck in a small conical bun, the face as for him is endowed with fine features with a serene and benevolent expression. The fine-grained wood is coated with a blackish patina revealing red and golden ochre areas. Desiccation cracks on one side.
The Senoufo, the name given to them by French settlers, are mostly composed of farmers who have dispersed between Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, and Burkina Faso. Councils of elders, led by an elected chief, administer the Senoufo villages. Governed by matrilineal traditions, they are composed of clusters ...


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380.00

Statuette Mbanza
Tribal art > African Statues > Fetish Mbanza

Made by the Mbanza or Banja, cousins of the Ngbaka in Ubangi, this sculpted human figure has a face framed by very large ears encompassing the arches and the jaw. Its functions are similar to those of the Ngbaka, as part of therapeutic rites or in preparation for hunting. Abrasions.
The Ubangian crucible has produced many statuettes that share certain similarities, such as a heart-shaped face, as in the Ogooué River region in Gabon. The Ngbaka form a homogeneous people from the northwest of the D.R.C., south of Ubangui. The Ngandi live in the east and the Ngombe in the south. Ref : "Art of Sub-saharan Africa" C. Mullen Kreamer.


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290.00

Fetish Boli Bambara
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Tribal art > African Statues > Fetish Boli

br> Called boli ( pl. boliw ), buffalo , in African art, this fetish of variable size plays a central role in the ritual life of the Mandingo region. There are pocket "Boliw", and others that belong to chieftaincies, initiatory societies such as the male initiation associations Kono and Komo whose members progress through a process spanning several decades, and even to states. The main function of a boli is to accumulate and control the natural life force called nyama for the spiritual benefit of the community . Used as altars or performed during dance performances, they are creations conceived from revelations miraculously granted to the geniuses of the bush and transmitted to the soothsayers, using active amalgams from nature and , or organic: daliluw . Animal bones, vegetable ...


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Fétiche Songye Nkisi
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Tribal art > African fetish > Songye Fetish

This powerful ritual figure of the Songye, desecrated, was moved by rods placed under the arms. The horn filled with magic substances that rose from his skull was removed. The face borrows the appearance of the Songye Kifwebe mask. The cup that had various ingredients is also empty.
Golden brown glossy patina.
Three variants of this mask Kifwebe (pl. Bifwebe) or "chasing the mort" (Roberts) stand out: the masculine (kilume) usually with a high crest, the feminine (kikashi) with a very low crest see absent, and finally the greatest embodying power (kia ndoshi). This type of mask, still used today, appears to originate from the adjacent area between the northern Luba and the Southeastern Songye. Various ingredients were introduced into the statue's abdomen, into the horn, ...


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Holo Hamba fetish statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > New product

Located in the Democratic Congo between the Yaka and the Tchokwé of Angola, the small Holo ethnic group migrated from the Angolan coast to settle near the banks of the Kwango River. Hunting and agriculture provide for their livelihood. Neighbouring ethnic groups, such as the Suku and Yaka, influenced their traditional sculptures. The Holos have produced hexagonal masks and prestige objects for the ruling elite. The Holos used sculptures to guard against the influence of evil spirits, including the moon and the rainbow. These statues were placed near the houses as protection from lightning. Bird figures are also used to protect themselves from ndoki, or sorcerers, who activate evil spirits. In this case it is an intriguing figure, anthropozoomorphic, whose base of the bust, rounded, is ...


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