Tribal Art, online sale of tribal art, primitive art and primitive art
...
Search option




Tribal art - African fetish:

Fetishes are emblematic objects in primitive African art. Used by fetishers and marabouts, they are linked to many occult practices such as those used by voodoo.


Kasongo figure
Tribal art > African fetish > Kasongo figure

The personal protection figures kakudjis, used by the Hemba, the Kusu and the Kasongos, were inspired by Songye fetishes. The latter, free of magic charge, is carved in a rudimentary way, its slight asymmetry giving it a particular charm.
Glossy golden patina. Gaps and cracks.
The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that Luba . The Kasongos form a Kusu sub-group, now scattered among the Luba, Songye and Hemba. The singiti statues were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies during which sacrifices were offered to them. Alongside the authority of the hereditary chiefs, secret societies, masculine such as the bukazanzi, and feminine, the bukibilo, ...


View details

370.00

Vili statue
Tribal art > African fetish > Vili statue

The tribal fetishes of the Kongo kingdom have a magic charge generally lodged on the abdomen in a sealed cavity. The gaze encrusted with dark pupils is associated with extra lucid abilities. erosions.
The nganga , sorcerers but also healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation with the God called Nzambi through this type of figure, most often consecrated anthropomorphic tribal sculptures, named nkisi.
Among the Kongo, the nganga was responsible for rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to designate the notions of "sacred" or "divine". The most influential category of "minkisi kongo" consisted of instruments to help regional chiefs enforce the law. A metal object was nailed to a wooden figure as ...


View details

780.00

Songye statue
Sold item
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye statue

Carved in dense wood, the magic charge lodged in the summit horn, this traditional African fetish offers two opposite faces reproducing the African mask kifwebe. Although this statue has unusual details, its structure characterizes classical Songye sculpture.
Glossy dark patina. Desication cracks.
The fetish Songye, magic sculpture Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi), plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, the more modest figures reserved for individual or family use.
In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South Kivu. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba, to whom they are ...


View details

Sold

Songye statue
Sold item
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye statue

African fetish of the Songye whose face takes up the structure of the kifwebe mask of the Bwadi ka bifwebe society, but whose hairstyle is embellished with small horns. The sculpture is "desacralized", absence of ritual accessories and of the magic charge whose reddish traces testify to the existence. Black satin patina, cracks and traces of xylophages now eradicated.

The fetish Songye, magic sculpture Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi), plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South Kivu. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their ...


View details

Sold

Sukuma fetish
Tribal art > African Statues > Sukuma fetish

Female African statuette, without arms, with a bust sheathed in animal skin into which horns have been slipped. The top of the head is perforated for a ritual charge. These statuettes would relate to the ancestors.

In the southern coastal region of Tanzania, around Dar-es-Salaam, a relatively homogeneous group produced most of the artistic productions. It includes the Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is made up of a territory covering southern Tanzania to Mozambique, where some Makonde and the Yao, the Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua live. In the North-East of Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Massaï, Iraqw, Gogo, and Héhé have an artistic production presenting similarities with Malagasy and Batak art, which could be explained by ...


View details

390.00

Songye statue
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye statue

Originally from Shaba in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Songye are related to the Luba with whom they share common ancestors. This large fetish is devoid of its ventral charge bishimba and has for only ornaments, specificities of Songye statuary, an animal horn introduced at the top, and metal slats and nails on the face, reference probable to the ravages of the pox. The ears, hollowed out, are also symbolically filled with tufts of hair.
The Kuba did not produce fetishes, they obtained them from their Songye neighbors, who were considered experts in the field. Rods or iron hooks were introduced under the arms in order to move them. These protective fetishes with magical charges are called nkisi and play in African culture the role of mediator between gods and men. The ...


View details

750.00

Songye statue
Sold item
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye statue

Carved from a single block of carefully selected wood, equipped with its multiple accessories and ritual talismans consecrated by the nganga, this fetish sculpture presents a fascinating face reproducing the kifwebe mask of the Bwadi ka bifwebe society. . The bishimba magic charge, intended for protection, is generally lodged in the abdomen and in the summit horn. Reptile skin covers the head and forms the loincloth of the statue.
The fetish Songye, magic sculpture Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi), plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South ...


View details

Sold

Statue Teke
Tribal art > African fetish > Statue Teke

This clan ancestor figure is brought in to contain the mystical charge called Bonga. It was then wrapped in a textile that was to hold the load in its receptacle. The face is streaked with traditional scarifications. The clan leader had this type of sculpture adorning an altar. Brilliant cracked patina. Desication cracks.
Andeblis between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family, whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, ngantsed , kept the great protective fetish tring hated who oversaw all the ceremonies. It was the mighty sorcerer and soothsayer who charged magical elements, for ...


View details

450.00

Songye figure
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye figure

African fetish Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi) of the Songye whose face reproduces the mask of the kifwebe. Meticulously made, the sculpture meets the criteria associated with this type of object, the accessories being supposed to reinforce its effectiveness.
Shiny patina, grainy agglomerates, ocher residues.
These fetishes of protection against various evils would play the role of mediator between god and men. The large sculptures are the collective property of an entire village, and the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family.
In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba to which they are ...


View details

450.00

Kishi Fetish
Sold item
Tribal art > African fetish > Kishi Fetish

This statuette is the result of the cooperation between the nganga, the sculptor and the client. Sculpted according to the instructions of the ritual priest, the figure intended for the client is then charged with the bishimba elements intended to counter any evil force. The face is plated with copper slats. In African culture, metal has magical, therapeutic and apotropaic properties. Ritual ingredients were also introduced into the abdomen (bishimba) into the horn, sometimes also in pouches attached to the loincloth, in order to strengthen the power of the object. Textiles, feathers and necklaces were also necessary attributes to guard against witchcraft. The face of the man is both reminiscent of the kifwebe mask. The volumes bounded by sharp angles lend a robust appearance to the ...


View details

Sold

Dogon altar
Sold item
Tribal art > Usual african items > Dogon altar

Dogon altar, made of a mass of clay in which miniature irons and ladders are stuck. Piece collected in the mid-20th century by Monsieur Arnaud, accompanying Alain Bilot, renowned collector of Dogon art during study trips to Mali. These objects decorated the niches of the Ginnas. ("Dogon" H.Blom , p.234) The Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. Today they produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to cure burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost ...


View details

Sold

Zigua figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Zigua figure

African statuette depicting a small figure in a frontal, straight posture, swaddled in textile then coated with dark crusty materials.
Among the Zigua, this type of sculpture served as a support for initiation. The Sukuma of northern Tanzania use similar figures.
This piece of tribal art comes from the northeastern region of Tanzania, bordering Kenya, facing the Indian Ocean, where the Paré, Shamba, Zigua, and Mbugu tribes live. A relative homogeneity characterizes the productions of these groups, recalling some of the Madagascans and Bataks with whom, via maritime trade, contact could once have been established. This sculpture was probably used for didactic purposes during male initiations. She could also embody an ancestor or a spirit.


View details

390.00

Kongo fetish
Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo fetish

Consecrated by the nganga, equipped with symbolic accessories and talismans placed between the metal elements, this statuette meets the criteria of nksi objects. The Vili produced a variety of carvings for individual use nkisi, to which multiple virtues were attributed.
The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by King ntotela . With the same beliefs and traditions, their statuary is endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. Present along the Gabonese coast, the Vili broke away from the Kongo kingdom in the 16th century and the Loango kingdom became a powerful state. The nganga sorcerers, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God ...


View details

450.00

Boli fetish
Sold item
Tribal art > African Statues > Boli fetish

Called boli ( pl. boliw ), buffalo, in African art, this fetish of varying size plays a central role in the ritual life of the Mandingo region. There are pocket "Boliw", and others that belong to chieftaincies, initiation societies such as the Kono and Komo male initiation associations whose members progress through a process spanning decades, and even states.
The main function of a boli is to accumulate and control the natural life force called nyama for the spiritual benefit of the community . Used as altars or performed during dance performances , they are creations conceived from revelations miraculously granted to the bush genies and transmitted to the diviners , employing active amalgams from nature and , or organic : daliluw. Animal bones, plant materials, honey and ...


View details

Sold

Kongo statue
Sold item
Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo statue

African magic-religious objects.
Consecrated by the priest nganga, this type of African clan sculpture has a magical charge lodged in the glass-sealed ventral cavity. The statue also carries, on the back, a kind of swaddled bundle.
The charge or bilongo consisted of various ingredients from the natural environment including red clay, red wood powder tukula , white clay pembe... , but possibly human fragments such as teeth, nails, hair. The arms are truncated. This fetish of conjuration was thus supposed to influence the health, prosperity, enemies of its holder. The headdress is characteristic of the statuary of Beembe and Yombe, other tribes of the Kongo group. Among the Kongo, the specialist named nganga ,was in charge of rituals by activating a ...


View details

Sold

Luluwa fetish
Tribal art > African fetish > Luluwa fetish

The different types of African statues Luluwa, Lulua, or even Béna Lulua, with multiple scarifications, glorify local chiefs, motherhood, fertility and the female figure.
Fetishes were used to aid hunting, protection and healing. The use as a fetish of this squatting human sculpture, with an emaciated body, and bearing scarifications in relief, remains rare. Light brown satin patina.
br /> It is in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Lulua, or Béna Lulua, from West Africa, settled. . Their social structure, based on caste, is similar to that of the Luba. They produced few masks, but mostly statuettes of ancestors representing the ideal warrior, mulalenga wa nkashaama, as well as the leader of the Leopard society and statuettes mbulenga related to ...


View details

750.00

Songye Nkisi fetish statuette
Sold item
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye Fetish

This carved figure Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi )is embellished with feathers at the place where the top horn used to be. Her angular face is powerfully expressive. The magic charge bishimba was introduced into the skull cavity if the abdomen did not have it. The power of the fetish would be further enhanced by the presence of accessories, metal rings in this case. Light wood coated with a locally abraded black patina.
These protection fetishes for homes are among the most popular in Africa. The Nkisi plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the sixteenth century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left ...

Sukuma fetish
Sold item
Tribal art > African fetish > Sukuma fetish

Small anthropomorphic figure, devoid of arms, with a bust wrapped in cords, metal and garnished with cowries. The top of the head was hollowed out to receive various substances for a ritual purpose. These statuettes are said to relate to the ancestors.

In the southern coastal region of Tanzania, around Dar-es-Salaam, a relatively homogeneous group produced most of the artistic output. It includes the Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is formed by a territory covering the south of Tanzania to Mozambique, where some Makonde and Yao, Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua live. In the North-East of Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Maasai, Iraqw, Gogo, and Héhé have an artistic production presenting similarities with Malagasy and Batak art, ...


View details

Sold

Vili Fetish
Sold item
Tribal art > African fetish > Vili Fetish

Ex American tribal art collection.

Consecrated by the nganga, endowed with a magic charge (bilongo) housed in a box closed by a mirror, this statuette meets the criteria of nksi objects. The Vili produced a variety of sculptures of individual use nkisi , to which multiple virtues were attributed. The glazed eyes, encircled with resin, symbolize clairvoyance in a face with naturalistic features. Various accessories are present, some of which would accentuate the power of the object, metal in the form of a padlock, basketry backpack lined with textile, headdress made of leather, strips of fabric and feathers. Eroded base. Chocolate shiny patina.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo, led by the king ...


View details

Sold

Do you want to hide sold items ? if yes, click HERE
Songye fetish figure
Sold item
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye figure

A mediator object of a rare type, loaded with symbolic accessories and a twisted metal rod intended to grip the fetish. A thick, orange, crusty patina covers the sculpture.
The Songye fetish, a magical sculpture Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi ), plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The larger specimens are collectively owned by an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South Kivu. Their society is organized in a patriarchal manner. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba to whom they are related through common ancestors. Divination is very present in their society and allowed them to discover sorcerers and to shed ...


View details

Sold

Statue Nkisi Nkondi Solongo / Woyo
Sold item
Tribal art > African Statues > Nkondi statue

African Kongo art and its spiritual receptacles
This village fetish relating to the khimba society, has, in Kongo tribal culture, a protective function against witchcraft. This tribal sculpture studded with nails is qualified as a "nkisi" object thanks to the cylindrical receptacle on the abdomen loaded with "bilongo" magical ingredients (organic and vegetable matter). It is closed by a mirror on which a resin has been applied. The glazed look constituting the famous Kongo look suggests an extralucid capacity.

Matt patina, polychrome highlights, cracks. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads between the present-day DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with ...





Previously viewed items
Tribal art  -  New York - Paris - London

© 2022 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73A Rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100
visa Master CardPaypal