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Tribal art - African Statues:

In the tradition, the statue allows to represent what is invisible. In bronze in the kingdom of Benin, arms raised towards the sky by the Dogon to invoke rain, fetishes in the Congo, statues are the art of African blacksmiths. Sometimes worked on malleable wood, the statuary represents dolls, twins or even ancestors, with sometimes hard, elongated features and sour contours. The figures are raised, seated, with their arms close to their bodies or towards the heavens.


Crucifix Kongo Nkangi kiditu
Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo Crucifix

Ex. Belgian African tribal art collection.
Among chiefs Kongo in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the crucifix held the place, among the chieftaincy regalia, of a symbol of power the authority. A ceremony at the investiture of the chief required the future ruler to receive from the hands of a dignitary, in a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu . This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the sixteenth century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, was brandished during funeral ceremonies in which the object was subjected to libations of oil or palm wine.
Desiccation cracks, satin patina.
The cross ...


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490.00

Ashanti Akua ba doll
Tribal art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Ex-French African art collection.
Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, the Akuaba (plural Akua'mma)doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identified by their stylized appearance. Their flat and circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the head. This doll is of an unusual type, its stretched form carrying a small cubic bust on which the breasts point.
Black glossy patina. Worn on the back of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the placement of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer in ...


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350.00

Janiform Songye fetish
Tribal art > African Statues > Songye statue

French African art collection.
Intriguing fetishes that are Songye sculptures...the only accessories with which this ritual statue is equipped consist of a thin tie girdling the hips and a skin coil around the ringed neck. The kifwebe mask of the Bwadi ka bifwebe society appears here in a janiform appearance.
Satin patina, locally glossed, cracks.
The fetish Songye , magical sculpture Nkisi , nkishi (pl. mankishi ) , plays the role of mediator between gods and men. If the large specimens are the collective property of a whole village, the more modest figures belong to an individual or a family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South Kivu. Their society is organized in a patriarchal manner. ...


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980.00

Songye Kalebwe Nkishi fetish statue
Tribal art > African fetish > Songye statue

French coll.traditional African art. This carved figure Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi ) is equipped with magical charges bishimba which were inserted into the skull cavity if the abdomen did not have them. The power of the fetish would be further enhanced by the presence of various accessories, metal, quolifichets, etc... Beautiful orange-brown patina. Slight accidents and cracks of desiccation.
These protection fetishes intended for the houses are among the most appreciated of Africa. The Nkisi plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large examples are the collective property of an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the sixteenth century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of ...


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3500.00

Dogon statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon statue

Declined in tubular volumes, this Dogon sculpture represents a mythical being, or an ancestor without facial features. The head evokes, for the Dogon, the egg of the world created by the word of the god Amma. A disk forms the shoulders, extended by fine arms, one of which points to the sky. The Dogon decorative motifs, in broken lines and rings, associated with traditional scarifications, are engraved on the whole. They refer to the Dogon cosmogony. Medium brown patina.

Carved for the most part on commission by a family, Dogon statues may also be the object of worship by the entire community. However, their functions remain little known. In parallel with Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lebe, relating to fertility, under the ...


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Songola Bwami figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Songola statue

Rare Songola statuette, with residues of light pigments on one part of the face and tiny traces of red ochre on the other. These statuettes embody a deceased ancestor of the Nsubi society. Some of the sculptures were reserved for the Songola high ranking officials of the Bwami. Beautiful glossy patina, abrasions from use.
Mixed by marriage with the Lega, Ngengele and Zimba, the Songola are governed by the elders of the lineages. They borrowed from the Luba and Songye the Luhuna institution composed of dignitaries and that of the Bwami by their lega wives. The Songola live by hunting and fishing, they engage in sculpture although the objects associated with the Bwami cult come from the Lega. Among their reduced statuary, the figures of ancestors of the Nsubi society ...


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350.00

Dogon Tomo kä statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon statue

French African tribal art collection.
This African sculpture Dogon, offering common elements with Bambara statues, comes from the Parisian gallery Ratton. Presented to several renowned auction houses this work was estimated at 6,0000 euros.
Works of this type, named " dege dal nda ", or " terrace sculptures ", are used at funerals of dignitaries, adorned and clothed, on the roofs of their homes. These works coated with a black glazed patina illustrate the statuary of the Seno Plain, a region stretching from the foot of the Bandiagara cliff to Burkina Faso. At the end of the ceremony, they will return to the Hogon. Standing in a dynamic position, with large digited hands extending semi-flexed tubular arms, this female figure is characterized by her conical chest, draped ...


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Ngala/Ngbandi ancestor figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Ngala statue

Ngala statuary bears the influence of groups from the northwest of the Democratic Republic of Congo, such as the Ngombe and the Ngbandi. Probably originating from Sudan, the Ngala settled on the shores of Zaire. Wise traders, they also became famous for the art of blacksmithing and the production of weapons and metal coins. Their traditionalist nyanga doctors provided magical charms to promote hunting and fertility. Figurative sculptures related to mythical ancestors are used in cults similar to the yanda, with large statues forming clan emblems. Their musical instruments, also very diverse, are often anthropomorphic.
A balanced morphology composed of linear planes for this statuette represented in a rectilinear posture. The whole could skillfully indicate vigor and courage. His ...


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340.00

Couple of Lobi Thuna batebas figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Lobi statues

Ex Belgian collection.
This pair of Lobi statuettes embodying a bateba or lineage ancestor adopts a static rectilinear position. Their hairstyle would be that of the Thuna warriors. One foot is damaged. Grainy patina. The populations of the same cultural region, grouped together under the name "Lobi", form one fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Few in number in Ghana, some of them also live in the north of the Ivory Coast. In the late 18th century, the Lobi came from northern Ghana and settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, Dian, Gan and Birifor. The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu, to whom they turn through the worship of numerous intermediate spirits, the Thil, who are supposed to protect them, with the help of the diviner, against a host ...


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450.00

Fertility doll Akuaba Ashanti
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Tribal art > African Statues > Ashanti doll

Fertility symbols in African art Ashanti
This stylized female figure is called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma). It has traditional features: a flat, circular head surmounting a tubular bust with horizontal arms. A similar miniature effigy, depicting the child, is housed in the textile of which it is draped. These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, huddled in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

Shanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly "), part of the Akan group, living in a forested area. Like other people living in the central and southern part of Ghana, she speaks a language of the Twi group. This people regard women as the final arbiter of all ...

Epa Yoruba Mask
Tribal art > African mask > Epa mask

The Ekiti of the northeastern part of the Yoruba region use polychrome heaumes masks of a wide variety of types associated with the Epa ( or Elefon) cult. They appear at funerals or rites of passage. The release of these masks, which have been painted by their owners, takes place every two years. These ceremonies are also supposed to increase fertility. This is a sanctuary mask that benefited from libations. Crusty patina. The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the demise of the Ife civilization and still form the basis of the Yoruba political structure. The Oyo created two cults ...


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380.00

Kumu, Komo, Bayinji figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Kumu figure

Small stylized anthropomorphic figure, which was used during therapeutic rites. There are various therapeutic associations among the Kumu: Ntema, Lumba, Kilanga, Nsubi,... These ceremonies could be accompanied by divinatory sessions supported by the use of hallucinogens. Lustrous brown patina, tiny granular residues locally abraded.
The Kumu, Bakumu, Komo, live primarily in the northeast and central Democratic Republic of Congo. Their Bantu language is Komo or Kikomo. Several ethnic groups are closely intertwined, with similar associations: the Mbole, Yela, Lengola, and Metoko. Their artistic production also has great similarities with that of the Metoko and Lengola. Their divination masks were exhibited at the closing ceremonies of the initiation and circumcision ...


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350.00

Chokwe female statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Tschokwe statue

br>Among the rarest pieces of the Chokwe, or Tschokwe, this Chokwe female figure, usually associated with the Hamba type of therapeutic cult, embodies a female ancestor who is supposed to guarantee fertility or healing. These statues were arranged around the muyombo altar, a tree at the base of which sacrifices and offerings were once performed. Carvings such as figures made in sticks or poles (Mbunji or mbanji ), planted in the ground, also appeared. Related ethnic groups had this same type of altar, a witness before which rituals, oaths and important transactions were concluded. The glass bead ornaments magnify the dark sheen of the patina.
Erosion of the base, residues of ritual plastering. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwe ...


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480.00

Bassa/Mano zoomorphic figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Bassa statue

French African art coll. Rare Bassa hybrid sculpture, featuring a dog whose mouth supports a human head. This face reproduces the African mask named Gela , Geh-Naw , from the Bassa ethnic group of Liberia. A second face associated with talisman masks appears in relief on the back of the animal. Object with protective purpose, simialire p.24 in Tribal Art of Black Africa" J.B.Bacquart. Velvety patina, matt, greyish brown. Erosions. Residues of kaolin whitewash.
The Bassa group of Liberia is established on the coastal region, specifically around Grand-Bassa. Its culture and artistic production have been influenced by the neighboring Mande-speaking Dan and Kpelle. The Bassa have female and male initiation societies, including the chu-den-zo which gave rise to this type of ...


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650.00

Yoruba maternity figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Yoruba figure

This African sculpture naturalistic, allowing according to the Yoruba communication with the afterlife, features as a maternal figure one of the many female goddesses, the earth goddess Onilé ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources, and linked to the powerful Ogboni society among the Yoruba Egba and Ijebu. It could also symbolize Orunmila , goddess of divination.
Intended to be enthroned on an altar, she was worshipped by members of the powerful Ogboni, or Osugbo, society in charge of justice.
Satin polychrome patina, abrasions.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the demise of the Ife ...


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390.00

Nana Yakoma Ovimbundu anthropomorphic tobacco pot
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Angola

This exceptional sculpted, stylized female figure features a container on the back with metallic sheets on the back. Parallel legs are like tied at the ankles by copper wire. The digitized hands are gathered at the bust, under the breasts of a young girl. In the rectangular volume of the legs evoking a loincloth, a deep orifice has been arranged. Circular facial scarifications can sometimes be found in neighbouring Chokwe and Luena. The character is said to be associated with the mythical ancestor "nana yakoma", guardian of the sacred fire. This type of sculpture was reserved for the exclusive use of chefs. It is on the Benguéla plateau in Angola that the Ovimbudu , Ovimbundu, composed of farmers and herders, have been established for several centuries. They belong to Bantu speakers, such ...

Dogon male figure Tellem
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Tribal art > African Statues > Tellem statue

This traditional African art object was made to order by a family and was in this case placed on the family altar Tiré Kabou. African tribal statues of the Dogon can also be the object of worship by the entire community when they commemorate, for example, the founding of the village. These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on ancestor altars and participate in various rituals including those of the seed and harvest periods. Their functions, however, remain little known. Influenced stylistically by the Tellem whom they replaced in the Bandiagara region from the 15th century, the Dogon adopted this same vertical position in their statuary. Inheritors of the Tellem works abandoned in the region, they adopted some of them that they resacralized to use in ...


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Kongo Yombe couple
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Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo

These naturalistic figures, carved at the direction of the nganga, priest-devin, feature a couple whose glazed eyes are associated with mediumistic abilities. The Kongo believed that they fostered these gifts through the intake of hallucinogenic plants.
Bright patina with touches of red pigment.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads between present-day DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese made contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. Although monarchical, the Kongo political system had a democratic aspect because the king was actually placed at the head of the kingdom following an election held by a council of tribal governors. This king, also called ...


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Kongo Yombe figure
Tribal art > African fetish > Yombe figure

Ex Belgian tribal art collection. The Yombe statuette opposite, devoid of body scarification, was originally intended to hold a weapon. This type of individual fetish, activated by magical formulas and possible additional accessories, was supposed to protect or inflict vengeance. The eyes evoke mediumistic qualities. Mahogany brown satin patina.

The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombe were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rituals by means of carved nkondo nkisi fetishes. The Yombe settled on the West African coast, in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their sculpture is primarily naturalistic, consisting of court regalia and emblems, anecdotal objects related to the ...


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290.00

Luba Mikisi statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Luba statue

ThisAfrican female Luba figureis depicted in a classical pose, hands on her chest. Her headdress , behind a wide band uncovering a traditionally shaven forehead, is similar to those worn by luba women in the early 20th century. Through her symbolic gesture she indicates that the secrets of royalty (the bizila) belong to women through their role as political and spiritual intermediaries. The raised scarifications dot her bust. Dark brown satin patina. Desiccation crack.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, thus the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king ...


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390.00

Lega Bwami Salimatwematwe statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Lega statue

African Lega Art and Sakimatwematwe (Multi-headed) Initiation Materials
. Related to a Lega proverb, this statue illustrates the need for a global view of events, and thus the prudence, wisdom and impartiality that should follow.(Biebuyck 1973) Belonging to a Bwami initiate, a series of faces pointing to the four cardinal points surmount a kisumbi seat, an emblematic element of the Yananio level of the Bwami. Each of the initiates of this rank had indeed a stool that he kept until his death. This object forms a metaphor for the moral values of the Bwami, its meaning evolving according to the initiatory performances... The teacher guided the aspirant to a place where masks and statuettes were displayed, and it was through careful observation that the future initiate had to ...


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380.00





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