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Tribal art - Usual african items:

African everyday objects have become true works of art for Westerners. Used for ritual, ceremonial, or purely customary purposes on the African continent. They have never known the European artistic attraction, within the African population.


Ngombe Double Ngulu Execution Knife
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Ngomne Knife

Execution knives are also parade weapons, such as ngulu. In the north-west of Zaire, south of Oubangui, live the 6000 Moswea-Ngombe of Bantu language. Their neighbours are the Ngbandi and the Ngbaka and various groups banda . They knew no god but expected favors from their ancestors, including health and prosperity. Their jet knives used for hunting were used as coins.
For info: .http://www.memoire-africaine.com/armes3.html

Tsogho Reliquary Box
Tribal art > African Jar > Tsogho Box

This box with handles was intended for the relics of an ancestor, the bust figure surmounting its lid reproducing the silhouette of the "garde" reliquary of the bwete, or bwiti , in the Mitsoghos. Desication cracks, shrapnel. Patine mate.
The Mitsogho ethnic group, Sogho, is established in a forested area on the right bank of the Ngoumé River, Ngounié, near the Kwele. The Bwiti company, which has a system of reliquaries comparable to that of the Fang and Kota, formed the cohesion of the matrilineal clans mitsogho. Their masks were displayed at the funeral, and stored in the male ebanza initiation house. Like the other etnies of Gabon, they practice the rites of the Bwiti which would have spread in this way among the coastal peoples. Their sculptural production is varied, in the ...


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490.00

Dogon Ritual Sculpture
Tribal art > African fetish > Dogon Altar

Created with great sensitivity, this sculpture, which belonged to a lineage, reflects one of the many facets of the Dogon worldview. The statuette at the top represents the incarnation of an ancestor, the ladder allowing the ascent of spirits to the afterlife. The gradations also form an image of the different stages of an individual's life toward the ultimate goal. The gobo , iron hook, is stuck into the wood, recalling the sacred role of the blacksmith. Grainy sacrificial patina, light chips.
The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule, was charged with studying in depth the rites of this population established in the region of the Bandiagara cliffs. The Dogon are thought to be composed of several peoples who found refuge there following repeated droughts or ...


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680.00

Hemba anthropomorphic box
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Hemba Box

This lidded container depicts an ancestor, intermediate between men and gods, adopting a symbolic gesture, arms raised, one of the hands folded. A tiara engraved with lines delimits the shaved skull. The traditional sophisticated hairstyle, oiled and coated with red powder, then mounted on a raffia base, was organized at the back in cruciform element most often. The beard is associated with the wisdom and experience of the grandfather.
Generally made in iroko, these ritual sculptures were venerated by a particular clan and stored in funeral premises in the chief's house.
Patine golden brown oiled and velvety, very slight cracks. Erosions

The Hemba, established in southeastern Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba, have long been subject to the luba neighbour who ...


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Yoruba monumental cup with offerings
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Tribal art > African Jar > Yoruba Cup

Monumental sculpture of African art from the Yoruba region. Lidded vessels, adorned with a variety of subjects, are superimposed above figures of caryatids framing a central, seated figure. The human figures, evocations of fertility, ancestors, and orisa spirits, were carved in the round while bas-relief motifs adorn the walls of the central rectangular bowl. The various scenes refer to Yoruba mythology. Faded polychromy, matt patina, minimal cracks and abrasions. Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko ). These spirits are believed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare . The cups are intended for votive offerings, gifts for visitors, or for divination. Sculptures of this type decorated ...

Dogon Mil Attic ladder
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Tribal art > Door shutter > Dogon Ladder

This ladder allowed access to the mil dogon attics, earth architectures distinguished by a conical straw roof. These attics are fitted at a height of an opening blocked by a shutter and allow the seeds to be stored away from rodents and insects.
Tly beautiful heterogeneous patina mate, abrased by use. Desication cracks.
The Dogon people is renowned in African art for myths and beliefs relating to its cosmogony. Its population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in mali's Mopti region (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). They produce more than 80 types of masks, the best known of which are the Kanaga, Sirigé, Satimbé, Walu. Most of them are used by the circumcised initiates of the Awa ...


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Zande Vungara Jet Knife
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Tribal art > African Currencies > Zande Arms

Ex-collection Belgian African art.
This knife with double-edged blades is fitted with a handle sheathed with animal fur, more precisely. A weapon of combat and prestige, it could also form an accessory appreciated during danced ritual ceremonies.
odies referred to as Niam-Niam because they are considered anthropophages, the tribes grouped under the name Zande, Azandé, settled from Chad on the border of the R.D.C. (Zaire), Sudan and the Central African Republic. According to their beliefs, man is endowed with two souls, one of whom turns into a totem animal of the clan to which he belongs. The African tribal art of the Zande, or those who own a lot of land, apart from their court art consisting of spoons, receptable pipes and harps, counts two types of statues: The Kudu statues ...


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Crosse Dogon Yo dyommodo
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Sceptre Dogon

Named Yo domolo , or Yo dyommodo , this ritual stick is the emblem of the association yona of the "ritual thieves". Its structure is similar to that of the domolo which Dogon men carry on their shoulders and which is sometimes found on altars and in binu shrines. The cane yo domolo is however more sophisticated, the specimen opposite evokes the stylized silhouette of a horse's head, a primordial animal of creation, whose erect ears are formed of small figurines, and the end of the stick a half-open jaw. Characters are also carved in superimposition along the handle, in reference to the "Nommos" of complex episodes in Dogon mythology. According to Marcel Griaule, this object is supposed to remind the Dogons of how the primordial blacksmith acquired fire, for the good of humanity, ...

Crucufix Congo Nkangi Kiditu
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Crucufix Congo

Among the Kongo in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the crucifix was a symbol of power legitimising its authority among the chief regalia. A ceremony at the inauguration of the chief required the future leader to receive from a dignitary, in a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu . This insignia of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations of oil or palm wine. Height on a base: 29 cm.
The cross would not be a specific motive for the Christian world, the Kongo considering that the four branches refer to the cycle of human existence. The Kongo also used an initiation ...

Coupe céphalomoprhe Lele, Bashilele
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Lele Cup

Among the prestigious objects of everyday life, this palm wine cup also features a posterior handle on which a face is also engraved. The base of the object is damaged, as are the edges of the cut. Like their Kuba vosins, the Leles have a wide variety of ceremonial sculptures, used during divination rites, pacts, ritual ceremonies.
Belle glossy black-brown patina.br-pThe Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs, including cuts, drinking horns and cups. The Leles are established in the west of the Kuba Kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers.Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of Kuba territory and the Leles ...

Yoruba divination tray Onigunmerin
Tribal art > Usual african items > Yoruba Tablet

This tablet, which was used in a church in Cotonou among the Yoruba of Benin, is rare due to the presence of a receptacle for cola nuts. The center of the plateau, aarin opon, forms a picture in which the dust allowed the soothsayer to trace the solutions to his client's problem. On the outer frieze appears the face of Esu/Elegba divine messenger. During the divination process, in order to summon the orishas and accompany his songs, the soothsayer hammers the tray with a rattle carved in wood or ivory (iroké). Abrasions of use. Desication cracks. Beautiful golden light brown patina.

High on a base: 37 cm. Support of the ritualist named babalawo (or Babalao, or Babaal-wo, pronounced Baba-a-l'wo), priest of Ifa, in the Yoruba language, these trays exist in three forms. They are ...


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980.00

Sabre de prestige Kongo
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Sabre Congo

The handle of this object features a female figure in a bust, eyes closed, and arms folded behind the back. In the "geste Kongo" published by the Dapper Museum, the author states that this attitude of concentration is adopted in the face of the prophet or the nganga in order to solve a problem. A crusty rust formed on the blade of the sword.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kongo formed the group Kôngo, led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its apogee in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation with the God ...


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Game of awale Mangbetu two-headed
Tribal art > Usual african items > Awale Mangbetu

Ex-collection Belgian African tribal art.
Creus of 28 alveoli, this awale game is part of the mancalas family of games. The foot is altered. The figurative motifs, in the form of carved heads, obey the stylistic canonical mangbetu and zande. Clear patina, slightly abraded. Small cracks. Established in the forest in northeastern Zaire, between Bomokandi and the River Uele, the Mangbetu kingdom was expressed through architectural works that fascinated European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, ornaments, pottery and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King Mangbetu Munza was so dubbed The cannibal king. The ethnologist G.A. Schweinfurth in 1870 described ...


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780.00

Suku Nko-nku Slot Drum
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Tribal art > Djembe TamTam > Suku Drum

Like the Yaka group, the lineage chief Suku surrounded himself with prestigious objects, while the soothsayer Mwana-Ngombo used a figurative gong, such as this slot drum whose cylindrical sounding board is surmounted by a handful composed of an antelope's head. The object was intended for healing and divinatory rituals, and ingredients were also mixed for medicinal use. Beautiful satiny golden brown patina. Cracks and xylophageal prints.
The ethnic groups Suku and Yaka , very close geographically in the south-west of the Democratic Republic of Congo, have the same social and political structure as well as similar cultural practices. Their sculpted works can only be differentiated by their stylistic variations. Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of fearsome warriors, Yaka ...


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Double ritual cut Suku, Kopa
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Coupe Tribe

The ritual consumption of palm wine in an individual cup, Kopa , Koopha , was the prerogative of the lineage officer or the supreme matrilineal leader at certain ceremonies, such as a wedding. It was then passed on to the next generation. This wide cut has signs of use and erosion. It incorporated the treasure of the regale, prestigious objects symbolizing the status and reserved for the chiefdom. Faces carved in relief adorn the outer walls of the object. Similar models named koopha were used by the Yaka (Fig.6 p.17 in "Yaka" ed. 5Continents. ) The Suku and Yaka ethnic groups, established in an area between the Kwango and Kwilu rivers in the southern Democratic Republic of Congo, identify themselves as common origins and have similar social structures and cultural practices. The ...

Baoulé ritual spoon
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Baule Spoon

The usual African objects have always been the means of choice for the artistic expression of African sculptors, especially in Côte d'Ivoire. The rice spoons of the Baoulé, and the Dan neighbors, were not only intended to be offered to the most hospitable woman in the community, as a trophy. They were used at community meals that closed traditional festivals and ritual ceremonies, but were also used for fertility rituals: rice was then thrown at the crowd to ensure protection and fertility.
The spoon extends from a female bust with a long curved neck. The latter supports a graceful head with features and a very delicately chiseled hairstyle. Black patina lustrous by use.
High on a base: 25 cm.


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Dogon rider-patterned comb
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Dogon comb

Delicately made of bronze, a rider figure forms the handle of this wooden comb. Decorated with triangular-patterned friezes, it has six tips.
High on a base: 29 cm.
The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in mali's Mopti region (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). Villages are often perched atop scree at the hillside, according to a unique architecture. The history of migration and the dogon facilities (about ten main groups, fifteen different languages) relates to several hypotheses. Some historians believe that the Dogons fled an area west of their present location as a ...


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Yoruba divination tray Onigunmerin
Tribal art > Usual african items > Yoruba Tablet

Support of the ritualist named babalawo (or Babalao, or Babaal-wo, pronounced Baba-a-l'wo), priest of Ifa, in the Yoruba language, these trays exist in three forms. They are intended for ifa, a system of divination that represents the teachings of the orisha Orunmila, orisha of Wisdom. The babalawo claim to be securing the future through their communication with Orunmila. In Yoruba thought in Nigeria, orishas form a variety of divine spirits controlling natural forces. They are found mainly in Yoruba cosmogony but more widely in East West Africa in the diasporas of Central and South America. This tablet was used in Abomey, among the Yorubas of Benin.The center of the plateau, aarin opon , forms a picture in which the dust of wood allows the priest-soothsayer to trace the solutions to his ...


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490.00

Divine Oracle Katatora/ Kashekesheke Songye
Tribal art > Usual african items > Katatora of Songye

Sculpture whose curved center forms a support for divination techniques. Its janiform iconography, in relation to kifwebe masks, symbolizes a double question: with regard to the world of the living, and towards ancestors. Medium brown patina, desication cracks.

The Songye and the neighbouring ethnic groups share many institutions, including those related to divinatory rites. Thus in some areas luba songye-style sculptures were dedicated to divination techniques. The nganga will interpret the signs of movement of objects placed on the flat surface and rubbed on the support, in order to propose a solution to the misfortunes of its client.
Sye came from the Shaba region of the DRC and settled between the Lualaba River and the Sankuru River in the middle of the savannah and ...

Injera Oromo basket
Tribal art > Usual african items > Oromo basket

This three-foot basket was used to collect Injera, a kind of spongy crepe characteristic of Ethiopian cuisine. Generally they are made from a fermented seed from a local grass on Teff or Fonio.
Everying among Oromos, the pancake was made from corn flour or millet.
The object has a basket frame whose outer surface has then been draped in animal skin, which also constitutes the transport strips.


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390.00

Opà Osanyin Yoruba wrought iron altar stick
Tribal art > Usual african items > Yoruba Altar

Aimed at the orisa (Yoruba god) Osanyin associated with herbal therapy, this stick was intended for the soothsayer or healer. Welded to a central pole that was planted in earth, two stems support a circular platform with a stage. It consists of patterns of birds, symbolizing divination, and bells cut out of metal sheets. The summit figure depicts a bird with outstretched wings, trimmed with pendeloques, which, laid flat, forms like a small protective parasol, like a bulwark against the evil powers. Shed the Yoruba of the Nigeri , these type of sticks were emblems featuring birds. Aimed at the soothsayers, they were used for divination ceremonies related to the god of herbalists and occult sciences, Osanyin supposedly working in concert with that of divination, Orunmila.
These is in ...





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