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Tribal art - African Statues:

In the tradition, the statue allows to represent what is invisible. In bronze in the kingdom of Benin, arms raised towards the sky by the Dogon to invoke rain, fetishes in the Congo, statues are the art of African blacksmiths. Sometimes worked on malleable wood, the statuary represents dolls, twins or even ancestors, with sometimes hard, elongated features and sour contours. The figures are raised, seated, with their arms close to their bodies or towards the heavens.


Lengola Bukota Janiform figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Lengola figure

The African art stylized from the forest tribes.
Janiform figure symbolizing the male and female, lacking upper limbs, and treated in rectangular planes. This kind of object was used by the Bukota society. Lengola statues could also constitute ritual supports dedicated to therapeutic rites. The inclination of the head gives this sculpted work a great expression of gentleness.
Mottled polychrome and matte patina. Small crack.
The Lengola, are established near the Metoko in the center of the Congolese basin between the Lomami and Lualaba rivers, a primary forest people dedicated to the worship of a single God, a rare monotheism in Africa. Their society,the Bukota, welcoming both men and women, is the equivalent of the Bwami association of the Lega. Their ...


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380.00

Statue "pestle" Deblé Senoufo
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Tribal art > African Statues > Senufo Statue

An oblong face, a graceful neck and arms, a narrow bust, legs sinking into a circular base, and a solemn attitude. This female figure with fine scarification marks also carries a talisman revealing the influence of Islam.
Beautiful brown abraded patina of use, cracks of desiccation.
The Senoufos, the name given to them by the French colonists, are mostly farmers who are scattered between Mali, the Ivory Coast, and Burkina Faso. Councils of elders, led by an elected chief, administer Senufo villages. Governed by matrilineal traditions, they are composed of clusters of dwellings named katiolo. Each has its own Poro association that initiates young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years . They gather in a sacred enclosure called ...

Statuette Baoule Blolo bia
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Tribal art > African Statues > Colon Baule

This African statuette, Blolo bia, adopts certain canons of the Baule statues, including muscular legs with protruding calves and a frontal posture. Beautiful abraded polychrome patina. br> About sixty ethnic groups populate Côte d'Ivoire, including the Baule, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture just like the Gouro from whom they borrowed ritual cults and sculpted masks. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé, Baulé, within the ritual framework: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations ...


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290.00  232.00

Bamoun Rider
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Tribal art > African Rider > Bamoun Rider

This Bamoun rider controlling a prancing horse would represent King N'Doya in his victory over the Peuls in the 19th century. Dark brown leather dresses the shapes of the character and his frame, lighter leather covers the hooves. The king armed with a sword is dressed in a traditional costume, the Hausa having introduced clothing transformations among the Bamoun, he wears leather stirrups connected by a rigid wicker rod. The various decorative elements and materials used here form an exceptional work.
The Bamun live in a region full of wooded landforms as well as savannahs. This large territory called Grassland located in the southwest of Cameroon is also the seat of other nearby ethnic groups such as the Bamiléké and the Tikar. Bamoun art is illustrated by bas-relief ...


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1250.00  1000.00

Songye Nkishi statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Songye statue

Ample head with the features of the kifwebe mask for this work sculpted by the Songye, dedicated to a traditional magical use. This large fetish was individualized by the nganga for his client through symbolic and ritual elements in the form of metal, animal skin skirt, belt forming a braided raffia coil, and summit horn.
Misses, velvety matt patina, cracks.
These protection fetishes intended for dwellings come in a variety of styles in the many chiefdoms of Songye country. The Nkisi, Nkishi, acts as a mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, the smaller figures being of private use.
In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is ...


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Simian figure Zande
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Tribal art > African Statues > Zande statue

Rare Zande ritual sculpture, summarily carved in angular planes, with a head that looks like a monkey. The arms are flattened on the bust, the straight legs without feet. The eyes, deeply sunken under a prominent forehead, are encrusted with pearls. The top is hollowed out with an orifice, probably for therapeutic or magical ingredients. This piece was collected by its former owner in Bafwasende in 1974, in the former Zaire. Zaire.
Cracks, indigenous repairs, dark brown satin patina.
The Zande produced two types of works, the Kudu , between 30 and 50 cm high represent ancestors, and the Yanda statues of 10 to 20 cm, animal or human form, having an apotropaic role, exhibited during divinatory rites during the rituals of the Mani society. Formerly referred to as ...


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Lobi Bateba phuwé statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Lobi statue

Depicted head-on, with arms placed along the bust, this Lobi figure has a sunken head with a serious face. The large closed eyelids have been treated horizontally like the mouth. This ancient wooden sculpture, the Bateba, was placed on the altar after a ritual to become the receptacle of a bush spirit, the Thil, and thus become an active being, an intermediary who fights against sorcerers and all other harmful forces. The golden patina is particularly lustrous. Small xylophagous damage stopped.
When honored, these spirits manifest their benevolence in the form of abundant rains, good health, numerous births; Ignored, they withdraw it and bring devastating epidemics, drought and suffering. These spirits convey to the diviners the laws that followers must follow to receive ...


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780.00

Dogon horseman
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Tribal art > African Rider > Dogon horseman

Prestigious sculptures in African art from Mali This wooden sculpture features a Dogon chief with a scarred face, riding his mount. According to Gabriel Massa, only the wealthy could commission the blacksmith to make this type of rare, prestige sculpture for individual worship.
Old matt patina, erosion and desiccation cracks. The frequent representations of horsemen among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of the men, resuscitated by the creator god Amma, came down on the earth carried by an ark metamorphosed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious chief named Hogon, paraded on his horse during his enthronement because according to the custom he should not put ...


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Female figure Makonde Lisinamu
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Tribal art > African Statues > Makonde tatue

Ex-collection African tribal art American.
.Figure adorned with jewels, in dance position, bust stretched forward, arms free of the body and legs half bent. The broad face presents the traditional deformation of the lips due to the labret. Tattoos on the face were traced with beeswax, and scarified patterns were also printed for aesthetic purposes. This statue symbolizing an ancestor refers to the creation, according to which the first makonde man carved a female image that became the mother of his children and has been venerated ever since. Semi-matt patina, cracks of desiccation and missing on one foot.br /> The Makonde, a matrilineal Bantu population from northern Mozambique and southern Tanzania, wore masks called lipiko, mapiko , during initiation ceremonies for young ...

Dogon Tellem statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon statue

African Dogon art.
Male figure with columnar bust standing on bent legs. Short, small arms frame the face. Grainy matte surface, cracks.
The African tribal statues of the Dogon may also be the object of worship by the entire community when they commemorate, for example, the founding of the village. These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on ancestor altars and participate in various rituals including those of the seed and harvest periods. Their functions, however, remain little known. The figures with raised arms always symbolized a prayer to Amma for the granting of the rain that is essential to all life, and it could also be a gesture of contrition following the violation of a law that led to a drought. The southern part of the plateau ...


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490.00  392.00

Figure Niombo Bwendé, Bwemde
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Tribal art > African Statues > Bwendé Statue

Ex-collection African art from Belgium.
This is a reduction figure of the niombo, a sometimes giant funerary anthropomorphic "bundle" representing the deceased, buried at funerals during ancestor cults. The doll is made of a wickerwork frame dressed in textile. It was kept in the house of the chiefs. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by the king ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory and copper trade and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. The sculptures of the Bwendé were strongly inspired by those of the neighboring Beembe.


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280.00  224.00

Dogon Statuette
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Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon Statuette

African Statuette Dogon collected in the mid-20th century by Monsieur Arnaud, accompanying Alain Bilot, renowned collector of Dogon art during study trips to Mali.

This sculpture depicts a woman in a raised arms posture. A grainy patina is evidence of the libations administered. One hand is missing. Desiccation cracks.
Carved for the most part on commission by a family and in this case placed on the family altar Tire Kabou, the Dogon tribal statues can also be the object of worship by the entire community when they commemorate, for example, the founding of the village. These statues, sometimes embodying the ...


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Protective figure Tumbwe callipyge
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Tribal art > African Statues > Tumbwe statue

Tribes in the southeastern region of the DRC around Lake Tanganyika, such as the Tumbwe and the Tabwa, worshiped the mipasi ancestors through sculptures held by chiefs or witch doctors. A magical charge ( dawa )was inserted at the top of the statues' heads. Our female figure does indeed have a charge inserted at the top of the head. The diviners-healers ngango used this type of statuette-fetish to reveal witchcraft and protect against malevolent spirits.
Satin golden brown patina, cracks and abrasions.

Simple cultivators without centralized power, the Tabwa federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic current was expressed mainly through statues but also masks. The ...


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380.00  304.00

Statuettes Baule Blolo white
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Tribal art > African Statues > "Colon" Baule

This African sculpture of a young man adopts some of the canons of the statues baule, known as "colonists". It is, however, a blolo bian figure, associated with the spouse of the afterlife. Polychrome patina. Abrasions. br> Some sixty ethnic groups populate Côte d'Ivoire, including the Baule, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture just like the Gouro from whom they borrowed ritual cults and sculpted masks. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé, Baulé, within the ritual framework: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits ...

Lobi maternity figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Lobi maternity figure

Carved maternity embodying a thil, named thilbou khè bambi , supposed to protect mother and child.

Glossy brown-black patina.
The populations of the same cultural region, grouped under the name "lobi", form one fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Although they are not very numerous in Ghana, they have also settled in the north of the Ivory Coast. In the late 18th century, the Lobi came from northern Ghana and settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, Dian, Gan and Birifor. The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu, to whom they turn through the worship of numerous intermediate spirits, the Thil, who are supposed to protect them, with the help of the diviner, against a host of plagues. The geniuses of the bush, red-haired beings ...


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370.00

Fang statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Fang statue

French African tribal art collection.
This anthropomorphic sculpture depicting a young woman is distinguished by the quality of the modeling depicting shapely muscles and by its orange patina. Among the characteristics of the style of the Ntumu from the regions between Gabon, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea, the pout inscribed in the prognathic jaw.
Glossy patina, abrasions.
Among the Fang of Cameroon and in Gabon, each family has a "Byeri", or reliquary box, in which the bones of ancestors are kept. These boxes were guarded by the oldest man in the village, the "esa." The reliquary boxes were surmounted by a statue or a head that acted as a guardian of the "byeri" boxes. These were kept in a dark corner of the hut, and were intended to divert evil influences to ...


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Ogbom Eket Crest
Tribal art > African mask > Statue Eket

Private Belgian collection of African tribal art J. Putteneers.

This anthropomorphic dance crest features a face surmounting a stylized body composed of superimposed arcs anchored on a conical foot. Decorated with field diamonds whose once contrasting colours barely retain their polychrome pigmentation, it remains extraordinarily expressive thanks to a concave face in which the bulging eyelids are modestly lowered. This mask was used during the Ogbom ceremonies. Thick crusty matte patina. Desication cracks.
The Ekets are a subgroup of the Ibibio ethnic group known for its expressive masks. These Ogbom cimiers are among the most conceptual pieces of African art and relate to the most modernist expressions of the ancient statuary Eket.Il are open masks with a crusty ...


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530.00

Queen Bambara Guandoudou statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Bamana statue

Always represented sitting on a stool, this Bambara statue, with its piercing gaze, has a high "shell-shaped" chest. The hands placed in front form large flat areas, framing a narrow columnar bust. Beautiful golden brown patina alternating satin and velvety areas. Abrasions. Cracks and missing parts.
These female statues , or Bambara queens , Guandoudou , Gwandusu associated with fertility and fecundity, were surrounded by statues representing their servants, presenting offering cups or supporting their chest. The blacksmiths of the Dyo society, Djo or Do , used them every seven years during the fertility ritual. Infertile women then had to sacrifice a bird, wash the figures with a peanut soap, segue, then anoint them with shea oil. They also adorned them with necklaces to ...


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480.00  384.00

Dogon altar statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon statue

A strong presence emanates from this Dogon sculpture. Represented seated, the female figure has her hands placed on a vertical protrusion of the seat. The semi-shaven head has a sagittal crest running to the nape of the neck and lateral braids. Irregular grainy patina, with pink ochre residue of laterite.

Sculpted mostly on commission by a family and in this case placed on the family altar Tire Kabou, the Dogon tribal statues can also be the object of worship by the entire community when they commemorate, for example, the founding of the village. These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on ancestor altars and participate in various rituals including those of the seed and harvest periods. Their functions, however, remain little known. In ...


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Nyamwezi zither guitar
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Tribal art > Djembe TamTam > Nyamezi guitar

Traditional musical instruments in African art.
The hollowed out bust of this anthropomorphic figure is the sound box of a cordophone. The pupils of the figure are pierced, round beads were frequently inserted into them. Dark oily patina, mahogany highlights.
The Nyamwezi , Nyamezi ,("the people of the west" and sometimes "the people of the moon") form the largest group among the tribes living in north-central Tanzania. Coming from diverse origins, although sharing similar cultural specificities, their ritual and artistic production consequently presents very different formal aspects. The cult of ancestors and chiefs, of major importance within their culture, has imprinted their statuary. The Sukuma and the Nyamézi have produced statues represented in a static ...


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Makonde Maternity Figure
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Tribal art > African Statues > Makonde statue

It is for aesthetic purposes that the ears, as well as the lips, were deformed with the help of labrets among the Makonde tribal groups. This female effigy with a slender morphology shows an infant. Facial tattoos were drawn with beeswax, and scarified patterns were also printed for aesthetic purposes. This statue symbolizing an ancestor also refers to creation, according to which the first Makonde man carved a female image that became the mother of his children and has been venerated ever since.
Orange-brown patina, residual ochre inlays.
The Makonde, a matrilineal Bantu population of northern Mozambique and southern Tanzania, wore helmet-masks called lipiko, mapiko , during initiation ceremonies for young men. The Makonde venerate an ancestor , which explains the ...


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490.00  392.00





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