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Tribal art - African Statues:

In the tradition, the statue allows to represent what is invisible. In bronze in the kingdom of Benin, arms raised towards the sky by the Dogon to invoke rain, fetishes in the Congo, statues are the art of African blacksmiths. Sometimes worked on malleable wood, the statuary represents dolls, twins or even ancestors, with sometimes hard, elongated features and sour contours. The figures are raised, seated, with their arms close to their bodies or towards the heavens.


Igbo statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Igbo statue

Type of sculpture called "ugonachonma" depicting nubile young girls, intended to be staged in village squares during dry season entertainment ceremonies. These figures are specific to the village age groups of the north central Igbo region, around Onitsha and Awka. The woman has specific criteria of Igbo beauty, including uli tattoos. Locally flaking crusty patina, desiccation cracks.
br>The Igbo revere a considerable number of deities known as alusi, or agbara, considered to be the descendants of Chuku, or Chukwu, and as such constitute intermediaries to whom sacrifices such as kola nuts, money, kaolin, are granted in order to enjoy their favors. These sculptures produced in several regions range from about forty centimeters to human size, and are adorned with more or less ...


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Luluwa statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Luluwa statue

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
Many sculptures associated with the prestige of the chiefs were made by the Lulua, such as this unusual statue. His rectangular torso could have been hollowed out in order to constitute a reliquary chest. The motifs carved in relief refer to the integumentary signs of dignitaries, which constituted marks of beauty with symbolic value, revealing extraordinary physical and moral qualities.
Brown satin patina, residues of ocher pigments, abrasions and slight lacks.
Lulua is a generic term, which refers to a large number of heterogeneous peoples who inhabit the region near the Lulua River, between the Kasaï and Sankuru rivers. The Lulua people migrated from West Africa during the 18th century and settled in the southern part of the ...


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Nimba statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Nimba statue

This statue embodying a spirit of the village was used by the old baga to request the favor and protection of the ancestors. A box in the center of the village housed these statues which were the subject of offerings. Some of them were used for divination. Sheet metal plating remains rare. The head reproduces the morphology of the Baga Nimba mask, whose hooked nose refers to the beak of the hornbill, and incised hair divided by a crest. This national symbol can reach up to 50 kg in its largest versions. With his real name Demba / D'mba (or Nimba in the Baga language), he evokes the nurturing woman, but also the fertility of the hornbill . Supposed to increase harvests, encourage pregnancies, the mask is exhibited at various ceremonies, parties and funerals.
Mixed with the ...


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Dogon couple figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon couple figure

Belgian African tribal art collection.
This African sculpture depicting mythical protective beings would form the primordial couple, associated with the Nommos, at the origin of Dogon creation.
Their morphology is characteristic of the central part of the Bandiagara cliff, bombou-toro. The narrow faces topped with crests surmount the rectangular block of the shoulders.
The slender arms frame a long bust, while slender legs extend from slender feet resting on the discoid base.

Dark matte patina, eroded surface and desication cracks.


Sculpted for the most part on order placed by a family, the Dogon statues can also be the object of worship on the part of the whole community when they commemorate, for example, the foundation of the village. ...


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780.00

Fetish Bembe
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Tribal art > African Statues > Fetish Bembe

Balanced volumes and harmonious proportions for this statuette embodying the spirit of a female ancestor. The keloid tattoos bear witness to the successive stages of the initiation to which the individual was subjected. Sometimes set with ivory or earthenware, the almond eyes are encrusted with bone. Beautiful glossy chocolate patina. Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex. Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembé group of northern Lake Tanganinyika, the small Babembé group, Béembé, was influenced by the Téke rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo.Installed in the present-day Republic of Congo, the Beembe originally formed the kingdom of Kongo, along with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and B. They were under the tutelage of the king ntotela ...


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Monkey Fetish
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Tribal art > African Statues > Monkey Fetish

This cynocephalic monkey with a cup with its combined hands is dressed in a linen loincloth. With his eyes raised to the sky, he is frozen in an attitude of supplication. There are several representations of the same type, with different names depending on the use that is made of them. They were mistakenly named Gbékré (mouse) because of Delafosse's misunderstanding of two cults" (Boyer, "Baulé" 5Continents). Often linked to the cult Mbra of divination and possession, they belong to the group of "êtres-force" or amwin , intermediaries between God and men and given to the Baoulé by their Creator, as well as the sacred masks whose wide gaping jaw they share. It would also be a minor deity named barked . For propitiatory purposes, these sculptures were to constitute the interior of the ...


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Mossi figure
Tribal art > African Statues > Mossi figure

This crestless figure, an attribute of Mossi women, is established on long curved legs. The narrowness of the shoulders, extended by the arms spaced from the trunk, contrasts with the hips, which gradually flare out from the arched bust. Traditional linear scarifications stand out on the head. These carvings have become rarer due to their owners' conversions to Islam. The patina usually comes from renewed applications of shea butter. The Mossi chiefs have prestigious statues gathered in the house of ancestral spirits, and those of the soothsayers, representing ancestors, have a sacrificial patina. Beautiful patina of use, desication cracks. Ocher residual pigments.
Upper Volta, Burkina Faso since independence, is made up of the descendants of the invaders, horsemen who came from ...


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750.00

Dogon figure
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Tribal art > African Statues > Dogon figure

Statuette representing a kneeling hermaphrodite figure, hands resting on his thighs. This type of sculpture associated with an individual cult adorned the Dogon family altar. Thick and dense grainy patina in greyish browns.
Carved for the most part on commission by a family, Dogon statues can also be the object of worship by the entire community. Their functions remain little known, however. In parallel with Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lebe, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the Hogon, the Wagem, the cult of the ancestors under the authority of the patriarch, the Binou invoking the world of the spirits and directed by the priest of the Binou, and the society of the masks concerning funerals.


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Mambila statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Mambila statue

Executed according to traditional criteria, these statues supposed to embody the ancestors frequently wear small wooden tenons as a bristling hairstyle, such as this massive figure established in a kneeling posture, projecting its bust forward. The flat face bears expressive features, including a hallucinated gaze evoking trance.
Erosions and abrasions, velvety matte patina. .
Crusty ocher matte patina, locally chipped. Cracks.


Despite their small number, the thirty thousand Mambila(or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "< i>men" , in Fulani), settled in the northwest of Cameroon, created a large number of masks and statues easily identifiable by their heart-shaped faces. Although the Mambila believe in a creator god named ...


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490.00

Statue Bobo
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Bobo

This statue is dedicated to the rituals dedicated to Wuro, creator of the earth and animals. His son Dwo incarnated in the masks would have stayed to help the men. The character's crest-hairstyle is that of the Bobo of Mali. With his very singular face-tube muzzle, the character forms a supernatural being. The grid of the surface would refer to the suits made of leaves or fibers worn by masked dancers. The forearms are mobile, the elbows being wrapped in canvas. Red textile strips are knotted on the hips and head, dumb seeds adorn the helmet and have been inserted into the mouth. Cords are wrapped around the neck, sheep horns are trimmed. Remains of clay libations form ochre deposits on the matte wood. br /
Mandingo, most of which lives in eastern Burkina Faso, but also in southern ...


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Keaka statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Keaka statue

Sculpture of great sobriety and yet of great expressive force, it depicts a male being whose narrow bust gradually widens towards bowed legs. Thick forearms surround the umbilicus. The sketchy head is simply notched. This type of statue was used during funeral and initiation rites. Nuanced ritual patina, erosions.

The Kaka ethnic group, or Keaka, so named by the German settlers, is located in a border area between Nigeria and Cameroon. Their statuary shows a certain influence from other ethnic groups such as the Mumuye, whose statues also have short, bent legs surmounted by a slender body. Their very thick and crusty patina, their wide feet as well as the wide open mouth are however typical features allowing them to be distinguished from neighboring ethnic groups.


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780.00

Calao Senufo
Tribal art > African Statues > Calao Senufo

Large African animal sculpture that refers to the primordial bird that is one of the five animals of the Senufo cosmogony, the first stage of Senufo creation, the hornbill. It is evoked for morphological and behavioral criteria. The tapered beak is "interpreted as the representation of the male sexual organ" perpetuating the life of the community. The patina is polychrome. Erosions on the base and minimal cracks.
Linked to the Poro society which initiated young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years, this sculpture of Setien was placed in the sacred enclosure , where , despite its weight, carried on the head during a procession. The great initiates consider his bulging belly as the spiritual gestation of newcomers within the Poro. Poro is ...


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3950.00

Bambara statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Bambara statue

Tutelary femininity within African art Bambara, this sculpture of "little favourite", Nyeleni in Bambara, is soberly described, releasing a haughty and powerful altitude. The arms spread away from the body, extended by flattened hands, also give a particular dynamic. Lumpy greasy patina, cracks, erosions.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. Large masked parties close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the gwan ritual of the Bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven years for men, they are less demanding for women. The new initiates then celebrate, in groups, from village to village, their symbolic rebirth. It is the sons of the blacksmiths who dance around these ...


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1450.00

Statue Senoufo
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Senoufo

Endowed with a tubular excrescence for gripping, this sculpture of a female figure is fixed in a classical attitude, palms arranged around the abdomen, legs disappearing into a pedestal forming a pestle called " sedine " or " dol " according to the dialect. The figuration of bracelets around the wrists and waist should be noted: In order to honor the wisdom and knowledge of the elders, the Senoufo adorned themselves with jewels that could also be placed on the altars. Brown-black oiled patina, glossy. Cracks of desiccation, localized erosions.
These figurative tribal statues Debele , Deblé , sometimes called " child of Poro " or " bush spirit ", were used in pairs during funeral processions or during ceremonies marking the end of initiation rites. The initiates of the ...


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Baoule statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Baoule statue

A cynocephalic monkey presents an offering cup. These sculptures were erroneously named Gbékré (mouse) because "of Delafosse's misunderstanding of two cults" (Boyer, "Baulé" 5Continents). Often linked to Mbra cults of divination and possession, these monkey statues belong to the group of "force-beings" or amwin, intermediaries between God and men and given to Baoulé by their Creator, just like the sacred masks whose wide gaping jaws they share. It would also be a minor deity called barked . With a propitiatory aim, these sculptures were to constitute the habitat of the spirits to which offerings were presented and on which libations were practiced. Grainy sacrificial patina, drips, cracks and native restorations (staples).


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1250.00

Senoufo statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Senoufo statue

The stylized figures of African tribal art
This female figure offers fine proportions, the chest is sagging on the narrow bust, the upright posture carried by semi-bent legs. Heterogeneous patina with burgundy highlights, desiccation cracks.
The Senoufos, the name given to them by the French settlers, are mainly composed of farmers who have dispersed between Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, and Burkina Faso. The villages have their own Poro association which initiates young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years. They gather in a sacred enclosure called sinzanga located near the village, among the trees. Upon the death of one of the members of the Poro, the statues named pombibele were exhibited. Although exclusively male, the Poro society in ...


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2750.00

Cavalier Yoruba
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Tribal art > African Statues > Cavalier Yoruba

Glorifying an ancient deified king, a rider figure surrounded by servants forms the central subject of the scene established on a circular handle tray. This sculpture is associated with the cult sango symbolized by a double axis. The equine, rare in the region, was an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and the sovereigns. At the top, a plank connecting the heads is carved from an iguana or crocodile. . Focused on the veneration of his gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. Crusty patina. Cracks and abrasions.
Soruba, more than 20 million, occupy ...


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Statue Baoulé
Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Baoulé

This statue forms, for the Baoulé, an idealized, individual image of the celestial spouse. Its characteristics were carved on the indications of the diviner for his client in an attempt to remedy various problems.

Polychrome, matte and abraded patina.
Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé in the ritual context: TheWaka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke a assié oussou, being of the earth. They are one of a type of statues intended to be used as medium tools by Komien soothsayers, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from beyond. The second type of statues, made according to the indications of the diviner, are the spouses of the beyond, masculine, the Blolo bian or feminine, the blolo bia . About ...


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390.00

Ashanti doll
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Tribal art > African Statues > Ashanti doll

Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, Akuaba (plural Akua'mma)doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identified by their stylized appearance. Their flat and circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity. Worn on the back of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the placing of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer to witness its effectiveness. Velvety grainy patina.


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Gurunsi statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Gurunsi statue

Representing a hybrid creature, or a masked dancer, whose head recalls the animal masks of groups in southwestern Burkina Faso, this animal sculpture is supported by stick-like growths. She embodies a spirit of the bush. Heterogeneous matte, chipped patina.
Among the Gurunsi, the Lela, Winiama, Nuna and Nunuma are the main mask carvers. They influenced the style and meaning of the masks of their neighbors Mossi and Bwa. These African masks depicting spirits of the bush came out during ritual dances and were worn by members of the village equipped with integral plant fiber outfits that covered the body. The tribal ritual was supposed to bring fertility and prosperity to the village, provided it was performed correctly. These masks were also used during funeral ceremonies of ...


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390.00





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