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Tribal art - Bambara:

Bambara, Bamana, live in central and southern Mali. Their name means "unbeliever" and was given to them by the Muslims. They belong to the large Mande group, like Soninke and Malinke. Animists, they also believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala, which has 266 sacred attributes. One, by each day of the 9 lunar months that lasts the gestation of a child. Ngala maintains the order of the universe. Its existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, master of the Word, who gave all the qualities to men and who grows the fruits of the earth.


Bambara statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Bambara statue

Tutelary femininity within African art Bambara, this sculpture of "little favourite", Nyeleni in Bambara, is soberly described, releasing a haughty and powerful altitude. The arms spread away from the body, extended by flattened hands, also give a particular dynamic. Lumpy greasy patina, cracks, erosions.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. Large masked parties close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the gwan ritual of the Bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven years for men, they are less demanding for women. The new initiates then celebrate, in groups, from village to village, their symbolic rebirth. It is the sons of the blacksmiths who dance around these ...


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1450.00

Bambara statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Bambara statue

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Sculpted African figure, "Ségou" style, wearing the traditional bonnet. A balanced alternation of conical shapes linked by narrow sections distinguishes this statue resting on thick blocks representing the feet. Ravine surface, grainy areas, erosions.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. Large masked parties close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the gwan ritual of the Bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven years for men, they are less demanding for women. The new initiates then celebrate, in groups, from village to village, their symbolic rebirth. It is the sons of the blacksmiths who dance around these statues that were placed outside the festivities ...


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780.00

Cimier Bambara
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Tribal art > ci wara > Cimier Bambara

The Ti-wara in African art. It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hipporague antelope, whose name ci wara signifies of the earth. A particularly stylized vertical version of the Ci Wara, it features a long neck topped with a rectangular snout head and high parallel horns. Oiled dark patina. Ochre residual inlays. Desication cracks.
Ported to the top of the skull and held in place by a sort of small basket, these cimiers accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tion , an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks bound the field as they leaped to drive out nyama, evil scents, and to detect any danger, or to flush out evil geniuses ...


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Boli Fetish
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Tribal art > African Statues > Boli Fetish

Ex-collection Belgian tribal art.
Called boli (pl. boliw), buffle, in African art, this fetish of varying size plays a central role in the ritual life of the Mandingo region. There are pocket "Boliw", and others that belong to chiefdoms, initiation societies such as the male initiation associations Kono and Komo whose members progress through a process spanning several decades, and even to Etats.La main function of a boli is to accumulate and control the natural life force called nyama for the spiritual benefit of the community. Used as altars or performed during dance performances, they are creations designed from revelations miraculously tuned to the geniuses of the bush and transmitted to the soothsayers, using active amalgams from nature and, or organic: daliluw . Animal bones, ...


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Ti wara crest
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Tribal art > African mask > Ti wara crest

The Ti-wara in African art.
"Antelope" mask with balanced concentrated proportions, very soberly embellished with friezes engraved on the forehead. Traces of kaolin, smooth, satin patina, medium brown.

It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of an antelope, whose name ci wara means "wild of the earth. Carried at the top of the skull and held in place by a kind of small basket, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks traversed the field while leaping in order to drive out from this one the nyama, malefic emanations, and to detect any danger, or to flush out ...


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Bamileke Seat
Tribal art > African Chair > Bamileke Seat

In African art, the Bamiléké demonstrate their know-how through the use of multicolored beads.
This monoxyle seat having the appearance of a table, named rü mfo among the Bamum, presents human figurative motifs enhanced by contrasting colours. A basic structure is carved in wood and then covered, above a raffia canvas, with a latticework of imported multicolored beads. br>
Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North West Province of Cameroon, the Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun, or Bamum and Bamileke. Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations, secret societies, are organized around the Fon who has broad powers. Among the Bamilékés of Sudano-Bantu origin, as in other ethnic ...


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750.00

Statue Bamana
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Bamana

Female figure called "little favorite", Nyeleni in Bambara, erected on a circular base, arms spread out from the body, breasts in "shell" on a narrow bust. The face is topped with a ridged crest. The statuette, adorned with decorative motifs associated with traditional scarification marks, has a dull, abraded patina of age, revealing an underlying light wood. Desiccation cracks. The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all qualities to men and who makes the fruits of the earth grow. Great masked festivals close the initiation rites ...


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Boli fetish
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Tribal art > African Statues > Boli fetish

Called boli ( pl. boliw ), buffalo, in African art, this fetish of varying size plays a central role in the ritual life of the Mandingo region. There are pocket "Boliw", and others that belong to chieftaincies, initiation societies such as the Kono and Komo male initiation associations whose members progress through a process spanning decades, and even states.
The main function of a boli is to accumulate and control the natural life force called nyama for the spiritual benefit of the community . Used as altars or performed during dance performances , they are creations conceived from revelations miraculously granted to the bush genies and transmitted to the diviners , employing active amalgams from nature and , or organic : daliluw. Animal bones, plant materials, honey and ...


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Bamana mask
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Tribal art > African mask > Bamana mask

Rare African zoomorphic mask of the Bambara with an articulated tongue. Geometric patterns are engraved on this mask, giving an illusion of texture. Natural matte patina partially blackened. Established in central and southern Mali, in a savannah area, the Bambara, "Bamana" or "unbelievers", as the Muslims have called them, belong to the large Mande group, along with the Soninke and the Malinke. Mostly farmers, but also breeders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. The groups of Bambara artisans nyamakala , more specifically the blacksmiths named numu , are in charge of sculpting ritual objects, endowed with the nyama , occult energy. Using fire and magical objects, the role of healer and diviner is also assigned to them.
Their powers are transmitted to their ...


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Bambara Queen
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Tribal art > African Statues > Bambara Queen

The female figure has an angular, austere face and a conical "shell-shaped" chest. Always represented seated, she has the distinctive Bambara hairstyle, a crest and two lateral braids. Beautiful brown satin patina, inlaid with ochre residues.
These female statues, or Bambara queens, Guandoudou , Gwandusu associated with fertility and fecundity, were surrounded by statues representing their servants, presenting offering cups or supporting their chest. The blacksmiths of the Dyo society, Djo or Do , used them every seven years during the fertility ritual. Infertile women then had to sacrifice a bird, wash the figures with a peanut soap, segue, then anoint them with shea oil. They also adorned them with necklaces to activate their magical power.

The Bambara or ...


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Ci wara Bamana/Bozo polychrome crest mask
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Tribal art > African mask > Ti wara mask

Polychrome declensions of the Ci Wara in African art
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. From a quadrangular base rises a monoxyl sculpture evoking the hippotrague antelope . Multicolored geometric patterns and graphic symbols are painted on the object, probably related to the sixteen signs used in geomancy by the Bambara. The zigzag lines would represent the movements of the sun, certain angles representing the cardinal points, each additional element participating in the reading of these signs. Vivid polychrome sandy patina.
It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means "wilderness of the earth". Worn on top of the skull ...

Queen Bambara Guandoudou statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Bamana statue

Always represented sitting on a stool, this Bambara statue, with its piercing gaze, has a high "shell-shaped" chest. The hands placed in front form large flat areas, framing a narrow columnar bust. Beautiful golden brown patina alternating satin and velvety areas. Abrasions. Cracks and missing parts.
These female statues , or Bambara queens , Guandoudou , Gwandusu associated with fertility and fecundity, were surrounded by statues representing their servants, presenting offering cups or supporting their chest. The blacksmiths of the Dyo society, Djo or Do , used them every seven years during the fertility ritual. Infertile women then had to sacrifice a bird, wash the figures with a peanut soap, segue, then anoint them with shea oil. They also adorned them with necklaces to ...


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480.00

Bamana rider figure
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Tribal art > African Rider > Bambara rider

Ex-collection of French African art. The Bamana, like the Dogon, magnify the ancestors through representations of horsemen on horseback. These last ones constitute major characters of the theater of puppets organized by the associations of young people.
These works also evoke the horse races between young Bamana. The ears and hands of this naked rider, riding without stirrups, have been symbolically accentuated.
Beautiful warm brown patina, velvety, residual ochre inlays. Misses.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. Groups of Bambara artisans nyamakala , more specifically the blacksmiths named numu , are in charge of carving ritual objects, endowed with the nyama , occult energy. Using fire ...


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Bambara Nyeleni callipyge statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Bambara statue

An austere, angular face, overlooking a body articulated around globular masses, such is this statue Bambara, named 'little favorite', Nyeleni in Bambara. Black greasy patina, ochre inlays. Slight cracks and abrasions.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creative god generically called Ngala and who maintains the order of the universe. Its existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who has given all the qualities to men and who grows the fruits of the earth. Large masked festivals close the initiation rites of the association dyo and the ritual of gwan s bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a seven-year period for men, they are less demanding ...

Bamana, Bambara,  Tji wara crest
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Tribal art > African mask > Ci wara Bamana

African art and Bambara founding myths
. This abstract sculpture composed of an exceptional arrangement of diverse forms evokes the antelope-horse Ciwara ("false of the earth") who is said to have taught man agriculture. She is also said to have given him the first grain. The crest was attached to a basketry hat by raffia ties. Beautiful glossy patina. Worn at the top of the skull, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn , an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks would leap across the field to drive away the nyama, evil effluvia, from the field and to detect any danger, or to flush out evil genies that could take away the souls of the plants grown as well as the life force of their seeds.

Established in central ...

Bambara mask
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Tribal art > ci wara > Bambara mask

The Ti-wara, Ci wara, in African art.
It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means "false of the earth". In addition to a decoration engraved with fine geometric patterns, the tapered horns are banded with metal, like the forehead. Successive arches represent the wide neckline bearing a mane. The details of this dynamic figure with elegant forms allow it to be attributed to the Sikasso region. Very beautiful brown-black satin patina. Worn at the top of the skull and held in place by a sort of small basket, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn , an association dedicated to ...


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Statue Bambara
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Bambara

African art among the Bambara.
Conical volumes for this African figure of "little favorite", Nyeleni in Bambara, whose feet disappear in a circular base. An angular, airy rhythm gives life to this statue. Shaded and abraded brown patina.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the great Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who makes the fruits of the earth grow. Great masked festivals close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the ritual of the gwan of the Bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven ...


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Fetish Boli Bambara
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Tribal art > African fetish > Fetish Boli

This sculpture of a hunchbacked quadruped with a tail with an opening, has a thick, dark, blackish, hardened earthen layer impregnated with sacrificial elements, on which light-colored drips are outlined.
Called boli ( pl. boliw ), buffalo, in African tribal art, this fetish of variable size plays a central role in the ritual life of the Mandingo region. There are pocket "Boliw", and others that belong to chieftaincies, initiation societies such as the male initiation associations Kono and Komo whose members progress through a process spanning several decades, and even to states. The main function of a boli is to accumulate and control the natural life force called nyama for the spiritual benefit of the community . Used as altars or performed during dance performances, they ...


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Fetish Boli Bambara
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Tribal art > African Statues > Fetish Boli

br> Called boli ( pl. boliw ), buffalo , in African art, this fetish of variable size plays a central role in the ritual life of the Mandingo region. There are pocket "Boliw", and others that belong to chieftaincies, initiatory societies such as the male initiation associations Kono and Komo whose members progress through a process spanning several decades, and even to states. The main function of a boli is to accumulate and control the natural life force called nyama for the spiritual benefit of the community . Used as altars or performed during dance performances, they are creations conceived from revelations miraculously granted to the geniuses of the bush and transmitted to the soothsayers, using active amalgams from nature and , or organic: daliluw . Animal bones, vegetable ...


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Mask crest Ci Wara kun of Bambara
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Tribal art > African mask > Ti Wara Mask

The Ti-wara, Ci wara, in African art.
This would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hipporague antelope, whose name ci wara signifies of the earth. In addition to a decoration engraved with fine geometric patterns, the end of the horns is wrapped in leather and hair. Successive arches feature the wide neckline with a mane. The characteristics allow it to be attributed to the stylistic canons of the Ségou region. Light brown patina.
Ported to the top of the skull and held in place by a sort of small basket, these cimiers accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tion , an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks bound the field as ...

Fetish Boli Bambara
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Tribal art > African fetish > Fetish Boli

Called boli (pl. boliw ), buffle, in African art, this fetish of varying size plays a central role in the ritual life of the Mandingo region. There are Boliw from handheld, and others belonging to chiefdoms, initiation societies such as the Kono and Komo whose members are progressing through a process spanning several decades, and even at Etats.La main function of a boli is to accumulate and control the natural life force called nyama for the spiritual benefit of the community. Used as altars or performed during dance performances, they are creations conceived from revelations miraculously granted to the geniuses of the bush and transmitted to the soothsayers, using active amalgams from nature and, or organic: daliluw . Animal bones, plant materials, honey and metal are clustered around ...


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