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Tribal art - Kongo:




Crucifix Kongo
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Crucifix Kongo

Among the Kongo at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries, the crucifix was a symbol of power among the regalia chieffaux. A ceremony at the chief's inauguration required the future leader to recovel at the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu . This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations of oil or palm wine. The cross would not be a specific motif to the Christian world, the Kongo considering that the four branches refer to the cycle of human existence. The Kongo also used an initiation ceremony, the kimpasi , in which the ...


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Kongo Fetish
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Tribal art > African fetish > Kongo Fetish

Coll. Belgian African art.

The nganga, sorcerers but also healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through figures, mostly consecrated anthropomorphic tribal sculptures, called nkisi. These tribal statues, in this case a domestic idol, have a magical charge usually lodged on the abdomen behind a mirror blocking the cavity. This copy embodies a powerful character, wearing the headdress of the chef, with an aquiline nose and eyes with dark pupils, loaded with a bag in which were introduced the magic charge or therapeutic ingredients named bilongo . Clear patien, abrasions.
Shez the Kongo, nganga took care of the rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to refer to the ...


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Yombe Fetish
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Tribal art > African Statues > Yombe Fetish

Tribal statuette previously consecrated by the priest nganga , it has a magical charge lodged in the abdominal cavity blocked by glass. The load or bilongo consists of various ingredients from the natural environment including red clay, red wood powder tukula, white clay pembe... , but possibly human fragments such as teeth, nails, hair. This fetish of conspiracy, established on a pedestal, was therefore supposed to influence adversity. The circular pupils are encrusted with white clay. The face adopts a menacing appearance. The arms are positioned around the abdominal cavity and the back has a classic arch that protrudes the buttocks of the character. The headdress is characteristic of the statuary Beembé and Yombé, other tribes of the Kongo group. The ropes symbolize the action of ...


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Vili statue
Tribal art > African fetish > Vili statue

The tribal fetishes of the Kongo kingdom have a magic charge generally lodged on the abdomen in a sealed cavity. The gaze encrusted with dark pupils is associated with extra lucid abilities. erosions.
The nganga , sorcerers but also healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation with the God called Nzambi through this type of figure, most often consecrated anthropomorphic tribal sculptures, named nkisi.
Among the Kongo, the nganga was responsible for rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to designate the notions of "sacred" or "divine". The most influential category of "minkisi kongo" consisted of instruments to help regional chiefs enforce the law. A metal object was nailed to a wooden figure as ...


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780.00

Kongo Crucifix
Tribal art > Usual african items > Kongo Crucifix

Belgian African tribal art collection.
Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix took the place, among the chiefly regalia, of a symbol of the power of authority. A ceremony during the investiture of the chief required that the future leader receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or palm wine. Height on base: 28 cm. The cross would not be a motif specific to the Christian world, the Kongo consider that ...


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390.00

Crucufix Congo
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Crucufix Congo

Among the Kongo in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the crucifix was a symbol of power legitimising its authority among the chief regalia. A ceremony at the inauguration of the chief required the future leader to receive from a dignitary, in a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu . This insignia of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations of oil or palm wine. Height on a base: 29 cm.
The cross would not be a specific motive for the Christian world, the Kongo considering that the four branches refer to the cycle of human existence. The Kongo also used an initiation ...


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Virgo Kongo
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Tribal art > African Statues > Virgo Kongo

Ex-collection African tribal art from Belgium.
. Inspired by Christian religious subjects, this African sculpture depicting a saint from the Catholic liturgy draped in a stole, praying with a rosary in hand, reflects the impact of the Christianization of the kongo. When these objects were not made for a local parish, they were frequently reused in fetishistic cults for diviners and chiefs. Statues of virgins formed the tops of canes of authority mvwala. Carved out of a rectangular block, the sculpture of a figure standing on a pedestal reveals, under the veil, only the face and arms of the effigy in a prayerful attitude. Dark brown patina, satin, locally abraded.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo, ...


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Kongo fetish
Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo fetish

Consecrated by the nganga, equipped with symbolic accessories and talismans placed between the metal elements, this statuette meets the criteria of nksi objects. The Vili produced a variety of carvings for individual use nkisi, to which multiple virtues were attributed.
The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by King ntotela . With the same beliefs and traditions, their statuary is endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. Present along the Gabonese coast, the Vili broke away from the Kongo kingdom in the 16th century and the Loango kingdom became a powerful state. The nganga sorcerers, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God ...


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450.00

Kongo statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo statue

African magic-religious objects.
Consecrated by the priest nganga, this type of African clan sculpture has a magical charge lodged in the glass-sealed ventral cavity. The statue also carries, on the back, a kind of swaddled bundle.
The charge or bilongo consisted of various ingredients from the natural environment including red clay, red wood powder tukula , white clay pembe... , but possibly human fragments such as teeth, nails, hair. The arms are truncated. This fetish of conjuration was thus supposed to influence the health, prosperity, enemies of its holder. The headdress is characteristic of the statuary of Beembe and Yombe, other tribes of the Kongo group. Among the Kongo, the specialist named nganga ,was in charge of rituals by activating a ...


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Nkondi statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Nkondi statue

African Kongo art and its spiritual receptacles
This village fetish relating to the khimba society, has, in Kongo tribal culture, a protective function against witchcraft. This tribal sculpture studded with nails is qualified as a "nkisi" object thanks to the cylindrical receptacle on the abdomen loaded with "bilongo" magical ingredients (organic and vegetable matter). It is closed by a mirror on which a resin has been applied. The glazed look constituting the famous Kongo look suggests an extralucid capacity.

Matt patina, polychrome highlights, cracks. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads between the present-day DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with ...


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Crucifix Kongo
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Crucifix Kongo

Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix was used, among the chiefly regalia, as a symbol of the power of authority. A ceremony during the investiture of the chief required that the future ruler receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or palm wine.
Height on base: 28 cm.
The cross is not a motif specific to the Christian world, the ...


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Kongo statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo statue

African sculpture equipped with a glazed receptacle for ingredients for therapeutic or prophylactic purposes. A bag, on the back, is tied around the bust as well as two small bundles along the arms. The gaze refers to mediumistic capacities. Figure sometimes illustrating a proverb, the character is represented here perched on a zoomorphic figure emblematic of specific clans, in this case a turtle.
Erosions, lacks and desication cracks.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified gesture in ...


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Kongo Crucifix
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Kongo Crucifix

Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix was used, among the chiefly regalia, as a symbol of the power of authority. A ceremony during the investiture of the chief required that the future ruler receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or palm wine.
The cross is not a motif specific to the Christian world, the Kongo consider that the ...


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Kongo box
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Tribal art > African Jar > Kongo box

Ointment box with lid sculpted in the round with the effigy pfemba, illustrating an African Kongo motherhood. The woman seated cross-legged, named phemba or pfemba, symbol of the mythical ancestor, would be associated with fertility cults. The child on her lap would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. Black satin patina.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom, from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites by means of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.
The Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities whose use remains little known.


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Kakongo or Yombe protective figure
Tribal art > African fetish > Yombe statue

Protective sculpture of lineage or family, whose glazed abdomen conceals a magical charge. The glazed gaze refers to mediumistic abilities. Figure sometimes illustrating a proverb, the character is represented here perched on zoomorphic figures emblematic of specific clans. Desication cracks, crusty light gray patina.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. The nganga sorcerers, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and ...


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750.00

Kongo Crucifix
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Tribal art > African Statues > Kongo Crucifix

Ex. Belgian African tribal art collection.
Among chiefs Kongo in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the crucifix held the place, among the chieftaincy regalia, of a symbol of power the authority. A ceremony at the investiture of the chief required the future ruler to receive from the hands of a dignitary, in a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu . This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the sixteenth century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, was brandished during funeral ceremonies in which the object was subjected to libations of oil or palm wine.
Desiccation cracks, satin patina.
The cross ...


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Kongo Nkandi Kiditu crucifix in bronze
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Congo Crucifix

Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix was used, among the chiefly regalia, as a symbol of the power of authority. A ceremony during the investiture of the chief required that the future ruler receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or palm wine.
The cross is not a motif specific to the Christian world, the Kongo consider that the four ...

Yombe Sculpture
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Tribal art > African Statues > Yombe Sculpture

Accessory of the initiation lodges nzo kumbi , this type of symbolic sculpture was placed against the bed of the house of reclusion for young girls in preparation for marriage. Two seated couples hug each other, while a dog figures at the end of the frame.
Satin patina with residual granular encrustation. Desiccation cracks.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites through of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi . The Yombe settled on the West African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola.
Ref. : "Treasures of Africa, Museum of Tervuren" ed. C. DE VRIES - BROUWERS (page 52 and 289)


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Kongo Nkisi fetish dog
Tribal art > African fetish > Kongo fetish

Kongo fetishes are famous in African art.
This is a sculpture of a two-headed dog whose eyes are encrusted with pieces of glass. The body which separates the two heads is, on both sides of leather socks, covered with nails. In the center, the cavity is inhabited by the magic charge. The Kongo use this type of object to try to resolve a difficulty and intimidate or repel the person who caused it.
"These sculptures, anthropomorphic or zoomorphic, have long been classified as vengeful spirits, but their function is much more ambivalent. It is when the nganga completes the sculptor's work by driving the nails into the nkonde that it acquires its magical charge. His action is not secret; on the contrary, his mission is public. Once the evils and their culprit are determined, the ...


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480.00

Yombé ointment box with Pfemba pattern
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Tribal art > African Jar > Yombé box

A maternity figure pfemba , carved in the round, tops the lid of this small ointment box. The woman seated cross-legged, named phemba or pfemba, a symbol of the mythical ancestor, is likely associated with fertility cults. The child on her lap would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. Black satin patina. The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombe were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rituals by means of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.
The Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwestern Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities whose use remains little known.

Kongo Nkangi Kiditu crucifix
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Tribal art > Usual african items > Kongo crucifix

Among Kongo chiefs in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the crucifix stood as a symbol of power and authority among chieftaincy regalia. A ceremony at the investiture of the chief required that the future ruler receive from the hands of a dignitary, in a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu . This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the sixteenth century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, was brandished at funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations of oil or palm wine.
The cross would not be a motif specific to the Christian world, as the Kongo considered the four branches to ...





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