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Tribal art - Yoruba:

The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision.


Yoruba cup
Tribal art > African Maternity > Yoruba cup

Maternities in the Traditional African Art of Nigeria. Refined sculpture featuring a cup carrier. The mother, or priestess, her face streaked with scarifications, is kneeling and has a zoomorphic cup with a lid, which is intended for offerings or divination. Offering cups, some of which were used to store kola nuts or other gifts for visitors, were once placed in royal palaces in the Ekiti and Igbomina regions of Yoruba country. The Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). These spirits are believed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.
Grainy polychrome patina. Deep desication cracks.
(source: "Yoruba", B.Lawal, ed. 5 Continents)


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490.00

Cavalier Yoruba
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Tribal art > African Statues > Cavalier Yoruba

Glorifying an ancient deified king, a rider figure surrounded by servants forms the central subject of the scene established on a circular handle tray. This sculpture is associated with the cult sango symbolized by a double axis. The equine, rare in the region, was an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and the sovereigns. At the top, a plank connecting the heads is carved from an iguana or crocodile. . Focused on the veneration of his gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. Crusty patina. Cracks and abrasions.
Soruba, more than 20 million, occupy ...


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Ekiti mask
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Tribal art > African mask > Ekiti mask

The Ekiti of the northeastern part of the Yoruba region use polychrome helmet masks depicting the prosperity of the community. The base of the mask, called ikoko, is surmounted by various figures related to the orisa of the Yoruba pantheon. The release of these masks, which will have been painted by their owners, takes place every two years. Despite the weight of the masks, the dancers perform spectacular acrobatic demonstrations. These ceremonies are also believed to increase fertility. Matt patina, slight remnants of polychromy. Eroded base.
The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following ...


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Masque Articulated
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Tribal art > African mask > Masque Articulated

This mask forms a miniature reproduction of a large mask of the Gelede society, a human head surmounted by a stage, in this case a figure of seated deity, leaning on two sticks, or a priestess of worship. Aimed at an individual use, this type of object stood on the family altar. Satin light brown patina.
The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to the mothers, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and the ancestors, osi and who can be used for the benefit but also for the misfortune of society. In the latter case these women are named aje . Masked ceremonies, through performances using masks, costumes and dances, are supposed to urge mothers to use their extraordinary qualities for a peaceful and constructive ...


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Gelede mask
Tribal art > African mask > Gelede mask

Ample African mask wearing a cap, it displays large protruding eyes, a particularity of the Yoruba style. The surface is perforated with crosses coated in a burgundy red hue. Desication cracks. Chipped polychrome patina.
The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to mothers, especially the oldest among them, whose powers are said to be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and the ancestors, osi< /i> and which can be used for the benefit but also for the misfortune of society. In the latter case these women are named aje. Masked ceremonies, through performances using masks, costumes and dances, are meant to urge mothers to use their extraordinary qualities for peacemaking and constructive purposes, for the good of society. During rigorously organized ceremonies, each ...


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490.00

Head Benin
Tribal art > African bronze > Head Benin

Wearing a fishnet that was made from coral beads, this late type head represents a dignitary from Benin. A symbol of wealth, this coral reserved for kings and dignitaries of the palace had to be regularly anointed with the blood of victims in order to acquire magical power. Dark patina, ocher reflections.
The many bronze heads and statues created with lost wax by the craftsmen of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, most often, placed on altars consecrated by each new oba, king of the ethnic group. . These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and staves. The Oba commemorated was thereby subject to offerings in order to come into contact with his spirit. Another tradition also evokes the ...


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1790.00

Yoruba sculpture
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Tribal art > African Rider > Yoruba sculpture

Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). This African altar sculpture, allowing communication with the afterlife according to the Yoruba, depicts one of the many female goddesses, the earth goddess Onilé ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources, and linked to the powerful Ogboni society among theYoruba Egba and Ijebu. She could also symbolize Orunmila, goddess of divination. Hairstyle and integumentary ornaments also indicate the social rank of the character. Thick matte polychrome patina, locally cracked, cracks.

The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of ...


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Yoruba head
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Tribal art > African bronze > Yoruba head

In African art, the artistic movement of which these sculptures are a part bears the name of the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba. This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funeral effigies in bronze but also in terracotta. The parallel folds traced on the neck would evoke the folds of flesh of the prosperous notables, and the hollowed out parts which accompany it were to be used to fix the beaded veil of the king. The parallel lines of the face represent the traditional scarifications. The openings around the mouth presumably represented a beard created by the ...


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Yoruba figure
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Tribal art > African Statues > Yoruba figure

This African sculpture naturalistic, allowing according to the Yoruba communication with the afterlife, features as a maternal figure one of the many female goddesses, the earth goddess Onilé ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources, and linked to the powerful Ogboni society among the Yoruba Egba and Ijebu. It could also symbolize Orunmila , goddess of divination.
Intended to be enthroned on an altar, she was worshipped by members of the powerful Ogboni, or Osugbo, society in charge of justice.
Satin polychrome patina, abrasions.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the demise of the Ife ...


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Yoruba Mask
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Tribal art > African mask > Yoruba Mask

The Ekiti in the eastern part of the yoruba region use polychrome hem masks illustrating the prosperity of the community. Our copy is topped with a male figure based on sceptres carved with human motifs. These subjects are associated with the various gods of the Yoruba pantheon. The release of these masks, which have been painted by their owners, takes place every two years. Despite the weight of the masks, the dancers perform spectacular acrobatic demonstrations. These ceremonies are also expected to increase fertility. Crusty polychrome patina.
Soruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the ...


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Yoruba statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Yoruba statue

Sculpture depicting a priestess or a follower with a face marked with "kpélé" vertical scarifications.
Chipped orange patina. Crack, abrasions.
Yoruba society has several associations whose roles vary. While the male egbe society reinforces social norms, the aro unites the farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. Notables come together in a society called esusu. Offering cups, some of which were used to store kola nuts or other gifts for visitors, were once placed in royal palaces in the Ekiti and Igbomina regions of Yoruba country. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo created two cults centered on the Egungun and Sango societies, ...


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680.00

Epa mask
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Tribal art > African mask > Epa mask

The Ekiti of the northeastern part of the Yoruba region use polychrome heaumes masks of a wide variety of types associated with the Epa ( or Elefon) cult. They appear at funerals or rites of passage. The release of these masks, which have been painted by their owners, takes place every two years. These ceremonies are also supposed to increase fertility. This is a sanctuary mask that benefited from libations. Crusty patina. The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the demise of the Ife civilization and still form the basis of the Yoruba political structure. The Oyo created two cults ...


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Benin bronze
Tribal art > African bronze > Benin bronze

The tribal palatial art of Benin.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in many foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. The killing of the king of animals associated with legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the cult of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, it accompanied the leader on his travels. The Oba, named "child of the ...


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7950.00

Statue Yoruba
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

This female figure is depicted kneeling, presenting a spherical receptacle in the image of the earth. It is intended for votive offerings, gifts for visitors, or divination. Sculptures of this type decorated the palaces of the country Yoruba. Subjects surround it, evocations of minor gods or ancestors.
Centrée on the veneration of her gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko). These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. Linear scarifications mark the faces of the characters in order not only to increase their physical beauty, but also to identify the rank or origin of its wearer. Body marks could be permanent or temporary, such as tattoos made from insect or plant juices, especially for court ...


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Benin bronze
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Tribal art > African bronze > Benin bronze

Bronze in the African art of the Benin Kingdom
Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in numerous foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. The killing of the king of animals associated with legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the cult of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, it accompanied the ...


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Statue Yoruba
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Tribal art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

Cup bearers in traditional African art from Nigeria.
The priestess with female and male attributes, her cheeks marked with scarifications in three vertical "kpélé" claws, kneels and supports a cup for offerings or divination. She holds a scepter and a rattle for dancing. Singularly, the cup decorated with Orunmila's faces is not hollow and may have served as a tray. The Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko ). These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare .
Crusty patina . Polychrome matt pastillage. Desiccation cracks and abrasions. <. Within the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the deity "orisa" who is consulted in case of problems through the divination ifà thanks to the diviner babalawo ( iyanifà for a ...


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Yoruba box
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Tribal art > African Jar > Yoruba box

A lidded vessel, decorated with various subjects, human figures, associated with ancestors and spirits orisa, and bird figures symbolizing divination are carved in the round. Bas-relief interlacing adorns the rectangular chest. Faded polychromy, matte patina, minimal cracks and abrasions.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko ). These spirits are believed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare . The cups are intended for votive offerings, gifts for visitors, or for divination. Sculptures of this type decorated palaces in Yoruba country. Linear scarifications mark the faces of the characters with the aim not only of increasing their physical beauty, but also of identifying the rank or ...


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Yoruba pole
Tribal art > Posts, Dogon, Lobi, Sogho, Oron, Toguna > Yoruba pole

Veranda pillar composed of carved figures: a mother figure embodying one of the many female goddesses, the earth goddess Onilé ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources, and linked to the powerful Ogboni society among theYoruba Egba and Ijebu. She could also symbolize Orunmila, goddess of divination. She is revered by members of the powerful Ogboni, or Osugbo, Justice Society. The lower figure evokes Esu, or Eshu.
Polychrome patina, erosions.
The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo created two cults centered on the Egungun and Sango societies, still active, who venerate their gods, the Orisa, through ceremonies appeal to masks, ...


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450.00

Yoruba statue
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Tribal art > African Statues > Yoruba statue

Figure "Esu, Eshu", or "Ogo Elegba", divine messenger of the Yoruba pantheon, intermediary between humans and the God Olodumare, supposed to grant benefits and punishments, and guaranteeing the balance of creation through offerings, sacrifices and libations administered to him. He is Legba in Fon voodoo. The characteristic hairstyle symbolizes fertility and energy. These carved figures reflect the iconography of tribal art Yoruba. Locally chipped burgundy/green patina. Erosions, damaged base.
The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . ...


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Yoruba statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Yoruba statue

Figurative anthropomorphic sculptures from the Yoruba kingdom

This work is exceptional for its size and the complexity of its composition. It presents a female figure leaning on the back of a seat on which sits a dignitary or a king. These statues form an incarnation of the many orisa of the Yoruba, equivalent to Christian Saints. The miniature figures surrounding it would be adepts or minor deities.

Among the Yoruba, public temples, altars or chiefs' huts are adorned with lintels, doors and carved pillars, or life-size statues dedicated to the mythical "orisa" gods and supposed to attract their benefits. Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by the ...


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3500.00

Yoruba statue
Tribal art > African Statues > Yoruba statue

This sculpture of African tribal art, supposed to facilitate communication with the sacred, reminds the deity of his duties towards men. It features the keloid marks of Yoruba nobles. Protruding eyes, plump lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. The head of the child has been replaced by a metal element.
The painting of these statues was frequently renewed before the rites.
Locally chipped crusty patina.

Desication cracks, erosions and loss.

The main Yoruba cults are the Gélédé, Epa, Ogboni cults, and the Esu cult. Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà , the Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures endowed with coded messages ( aroko ). They are designed by the sculptors at the request of the ...


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950.00





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